Imagine Planet X is clearly visible in the sky and the Severe Wobble has commenced. The Pole Shift countdown has begun, but how are you monitoring the passage of time?

 

Right now, it's a simple matter knowing what day it is and planning your schedule accordingly.  But when Earth is violently heaving from side to side during the Severe Wobble, a day will no longer be just another day.

 

In order to anticipate and plan for each of the Last Weeks events, I believe it will be necessary to begin recording time in at least 24-hour increments - beginning with the Severe Wobble. Although it may not be entirely obvious to everyone exactly when the Severe Wobble begins, anytime during this 9-day period will be a good time to establish a ritual of recording increments of time.  It will be unmistakable when Earth falls into a Static Lean to the Left and everyone will be able to see where they are on the Last Weeks Timeline and will already be in the habit of recording time.

 

The Zetas advise using "a manual clock or watch, not an atomic clock or watch adjusted by the Navy to disguise rotation slowing."  But what if the unthinkable occurs and you find yourself without a functioning clock during the Last Weeks?  How would you improvise to keep track of the days passed?

 

I plan on using two manual pocket watches with a couple of LED watches as back-up and will X off the days on laminated copies the Last Weeks Timeline, but I'm curious how the rest of you intend to keep track of the days and any alternative ways to record time should our clocks be rendered inoperative.

 

Right now, it may seem trivial to keep track of time during the Last Weeks.  But when Earth's slowing rotation makes each day increasingly longer and you're completely unaware the Pole Shift is only 6 days away, you'll wish you had.


 

Views: 4485

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Another alternative for timekeeping would be to build a Water Clock which utilizes dripping water into a calibrated container to measure how much time has passed. These were used during the time of the last Pole Shift. The only catch is, you'll need a functioning clock to be able to calibrate it. It could be a good fail-safe means of timekeeping, but you'll need to build and calibrate it before you find yourself without a clock.

Here are basic instructions on how to build a water clock to provide a conceptual framework. I would recommend using containers significantly larger than what is specified here so the clock requires less maintenance.

MATERIALS
Large empty food can or coffee can
Glass jar, narrower at its top than the can
Nail
Hammer
Duct tape
Clock or watch
Marker


INSTRUCTIONS

1. Poke a small hole in the bottom center of the can by turning the can upside down on a stable work surface and tapping a nail into it with a hammer. Pull the nail out.

2. Select a jar that can support the can on top of it while filled with water. A mayonnaise jar or other sturdy jar makes a good choice.

3. Put a strip of duct tape on the side of a jar, running from top to bottom.

4. Place the can on top of the jar and pour water into it. Check that the water drips steadily from the hole in the bottom of the can. If the rate isn't steady---for example if it drips and dribbles-- make the hole larger. In order for the clock to tell time, the water must flow at an even rate. Once the water flows evenly, you're ready to set the clock.

5. Empty the jar. Check the time using a clock or watch. Place the can of water on top of the jar and time one minute. Mark the tape for the water level at one minute. Add other times with a line on the tape as the water runs, such as five minutes and 10 minutes. If possible, try to use larger containers that take hours to drain/fill and mark the tape in 1-hour increments.
I have an imitation Rolex that was given to me a few weeks ago. It may not be that flash now, but it seems to run without a battery as I found out when I took it to the jewellers to replace one. It goes via wrist movement, so I figure if I keep wearing it 24/7, then the time keeping would hopefully be accurate.
A manual clock should be the answer.
Also, a non electronic vehicle, of the good old times, should be most useful for anybody who needs to do some travelling. Modern vehicles, computer controlled, may not be able to run at all ...
i have two manual 'krank -up' clocks (watches) and plan to rely on them. they have to be crancked every 24 hrs or so.

i also pondered about that issue once.
So, if I understand this correctly, when the earth leans to the left, then rebounds to the right - we'll be able to visibly see/feel this!? Thanks

I am concerned about determining a new calendar.  Earth may have shorter or longer days than now (24 hours) and perhaps more or less days per year.

 

Watches can help determine the number of minutes per day, but a celestial observatory will be needed to figure out how many days per year there are.  WAAAAY out of my league here.

Any ideas?

Kayla - If you're referring to the Severe Wobble that commences at the beginning of the Last Weeks, you may not feel it, but the results will be unmistakable.

ZetaTalk - Jan 30, 2010

"The severe wobble will bring a twice a day swing, which is not the hour of the pole shift but is a 12 hour movement. These tides can be expected to be hundreds of feet high, 200-300 feet, the worst being where a normal tide under the influence of the Moon is in process during the wobble."

Kayla N said:

So, if I understand this correctly, when the earth leans to the left, then rebounds to the right - we'll be able to visibly see/feel this!? Thanks

The Gregorian Calendar currently used by western society is arbitrarily based on the movements of celestial bodies.   Under the nearly continuous volcanic gloom in the Aftertime, it will be impossible to consistently observe these movements for many years.  Therefore, any precise timekeeping will have to rely on diligent observation, recording and maintanence of timekeeping devices.  And should these devices fail, what then?

Timekeeping will consist of counting the cycles of the only observable movement: nighttime darkness into the twilight of daytime and then back into darkness.

T said:

I am concerned about determining a new calendar.  Earth may have shorter on longer days than now (24 hours) and perhaps more or less days per year.

 

Watches can help determine the number of minutes per day, but a celestial observatory will be needed to figure out how many days per year there are.  WAAAAY out of my league here.

Any ideas?

Good instruction, friends...  its an example of  benefits of discussion, very instruct. Thanks all, all you are important. Special greetings Howard and Carlos. ...Lothar, I am writing this message with a dictionary, ¿Qué tal?

 

bedlamite said: "The Greeks broke the hour down into minutes and seconds. Why 60? I don't know that one."

 

In 300 BCE, the Babylonians used the sexagesimal (base-60) system for performing astronomical calculations since it was convenient for simplifying time division: 60 is divisible by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 10.   

I presume the reason why the minute is derived from the 1st fractional sexagesimal place and the second from the 2nd fractional sexagesimal place is due to how this aligns with the approximate 3600 year period for the passage of Planet X. 

60 seconds x 60 minutes = 3600 seconds = 1 hour = 1 complete cycle

I'm going to use one of them old cheap battery powered alarm clocks

Northerner - this blog was originally intended to address ways of measuring time during the Last Weeks only, should conventional timekeeping methods become unavailable, so we can know when to expect the various Last Weeks events outlined by the Zetas.  Any discussions of timekeeping in the Aftertime are an added bonus.


Mapping out the new constellations for the new geography is a task yet to be undertaken, as far as I know.
northener said:

thanks Howard for another interesting discussion.

this might be a dumb question, but will this kind of timekeeping be important afterwords? i couldn't think of anything that we'd need to be on time for -- except sleep in the dark, work in the day, eat when it's time, etc. And then the longer cyclical things like the plantings and harvesting, passages of a year, a life time, etc. maybe Einstein was right and time is relative !

I'm also thinking that we won't necessarily know the constellations in our relocated area, i haven't been able to find anything on this yet.

 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

SEARCH PS Ning or Zetatalk

 
Search:

This free script provided by
JavaScript Kit

Donate

You can support the ning by using the above button. Ning Fund Raiser for 2017 fees GOAL MET.

 

© 2018   Created by lonne rey.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service