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There are increasing meteor reports recently all over the world. More debris from the Px tail...

ZetaTalk: Live Chat, written November 21, 2009

"When the debris from the tail of Planet X first started arriving in ernest, in 2004, the establishment chose to call this space junk. When the public became alarmed at the amount of space junk falling to Earth they tried to enhance the story by claiming that two satellites had crashed into each other, but this just made a bad story worse. Since fireballs have not gone away, but continued apace and if anything gotten worse, a new term has been used - asteroids. This is debris in the tail of Planet X, which is increasingly turning toward the Earth, hosed out from the N Pole of Planet X. This is why the wobble has gotten more violent, why electromagnetic disruption of dams and airplanes has occurred, and why blackouts will become more frequent. There will also be displays in the sky, some of which has already been noticed, from the electromagnetic tides assaulting the Earth's atmosphere. Stay tuned, more to come!"

March 3, 2012

Reports of a "bright light" and an "orange glow" were received by police across Scotland and the north of England around 9.40pm.

The Met Office tweeted: "Hi All, for anyone seeing something in the night sky, we believe it was a meteorite."

A spokesman for Strathclyde Police said the force had been "inundated" with calls about a bright object in the sky across the west of Scotland. A Durham Police spokeswoman said a number of calls came in around 9.45pm from concerned members of public who had seen a "bright light or a fire in the sky" and believed it may have been incidents involving an aircraft. "

It has been confirmed with air traffic control that there are no incidents of aircraftin difficult and nothing registered on radar," she said. "

The sightings are believed to be either an asteroid burning out or similar which has been restricted to the upper atmosphere only." Grampian Police said reports of people seeing a "flare or a bright object with a tail" were received from across the region. And Dumfries and Galloway Constabulary said numerous calls were made about a "large ball of fire in the sky" across Annandale and Eskdale.

One user wrote on the force's Facebook page: "It was awesome to see! Really big and bright!" Hundreds of people took to Twitter to report similar sightings across Scotland and the north of England. People described seeing a bright fireball moving across the sky with a large tail.

The Kielder Observatory also reported the sighting of a "huge fireball" travelling from north to south over Northumberland at 9.41pm. The Observatory posted on Twitter: "Of 30 years observing the sky #fireball best thing I have ever seen period."

LINEAR INCREASE OF FIREBALL EVENTS SINCE 2010

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What a Meteor Looks Like

Source

What a Large Daytime Fireball Looks Like

Chelyabinsk Fireball (2013)

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Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on February 16, 2018 at 11:15pm

http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/36453216-75/fireball-of-burn...

Fireball of burning “space junk” glowed across northwestern Oregon on Wednesday night

Feb. 16, 2018

If you saw a brief, yellow-orange glow in the night sky Wednesday night, it likely was a piece of space junk falling out of orbit and burning up in the Earth’s atmosphere — and you likely were much farther north than Eugene.

Jim Todd, director of space science education at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland, sent out an email announcement Thursday afternoon about the fireball, which was reported to OMSI by 26 observers.

In noting their various descriptions, Todd wrote: “reports of a bright fireball around Oregon at 9:20 p.m., (Feb. 14), moving from west to east across a generally clear sky.”

The slow-moving ball was visible for 12-20 seconds, with no sound or smell reported and “appeared in two discrete pieces … a persistent train,” Todd wrote.

Of the 26 people who reported it, 18 saw it from spots as diverse as Portland, Newberg, McMinnville, Bend and Redmond. Washington residents in Vancouver and Kennewick reported it, and so — at different times — did observers in Wyoming, California, Australia and New Zealand.

Todd wrote that the glow likely was space junk because it was slower than a meteor and passed by at a low angle, and because it was yellow-orange. Meteors are more typically bluish white and streak across the sky higher, faster and brighter, sometimes exploding.

If you missed the sight Wednesday night, there likely will be more chances. According to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, “more than 500,000 pieces of debris, or ‘space junk,’ are tracked as they orbit the Earth.”

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2018/02/bright_firebal...

Comment by Juan F Martinez on February 8, 2018 at 6:27pm

Newly-discovered asteroid just days away from Earth

An asteroid predicted to be twice the size of the meteor which exploded over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk in 2013 will slip past Earth Friday – just days after it was first spotted coming our way.

The recently discovered asteroid named 2018 CB will come within a distance of about 39,000 miles (64,000km) – less than one-fifth the distance of Earth to the Moon, according to NASA.

https://www.rt.com/news/418233-asteroid-earth-chelyabinsk-moon/

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on January 23, 2018 at 11:22pm

http://www.sherwoodparknews.com/2018/01/22/meteor-seen-over-strathc...

Meteor seen over Strathcona County

Experts are hoping for the public’s helping in tracking down meteor fragments after a mysterious fireball was seen tumbling from the sky in Strathcona County and the surrounding region.

The strange sighting sparked a storm on Twitter on Wednesday, Jan. 17.

As the events unfolded, researchers were asking anyone with a security camera or dashcam footage, or anyone who may have witnessed the falling ball of light, to come forward in an effort to track down the meteor fragments.

“I saw a small fireball in the sky on the way home tonight! I was on (the southeast) corner of the Henday, and it was (northeast) of where I was — somewhere in Strathcona County. First time ever seeing one, it was awesome,” Tweeted Derek, @Corath on Twitter.

Reports suggest the meteor broke up around 5:22 p.m. and that, despite being seen from Strathcona County, it may have fallen north of Lac La Biche. However, researchers will need additional information, according to Frank Florian, director of planetarium and space sciences at Edmonton’s Telus World of Science.

Florian said a member of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada saw the fireball and said that, at peak brightness, it was as bright as a full moon.

The big “flash” suggests the meteor broke into pieces, he explained, adding the size of fragments would depend on the size of the “parent body” of the meteor, as well as what the rock is made of.

There are stony, iron and stony-iron meteorites. Bigger rocks will be further downrange because they have more inertia, Florian said.

“Wintertime is a good time to find little black pieces of rock,” he added, noting they will show up against the snow.

The University of Alberta recently installed an all-sky camera with colleagues at Athabasca University, which — barring light pollution — may have captured the space rock, meteorite expert Chris Herd said.

“People will always, always say, ‘Oh, it fell just over there,’ ” Herd said. “It’s an optical illusion. It could be hundreds of kilometres away.”

In 2008, when a bright fireball was spotted from Strathcona County, Herd and others found meteor fragments near Lloydminster.

Reports of the meteor brightening and breaking up into pieces is “fairly characteristic” of a fireball, said Herd.

He suggested reporting any sightings to the American Meteor Society at www.amsmeteors.org, and the Meteorites and Impacts Advisory Committee at www.uqac.ca.

Florian can also be contacted at the Telus World of Science at 780-452-9100, extension 2295, or by e-mailing fflorian@twose.ca

Florian said meteorites usually contain iron, so they will be attracted to magnets. They will have a black crust and will look metallic inside. Stony meteorites are usually a dark grey, while a nickel-iron meteorite has metal inside and may take on a rusty appearance.

A spokesperson for Edmonton Fire Rescue Services said crews were called out for reports of a fireball, but did not find a fire and were unable to identify the cause of the sightings.

In September 2017, the American Meteor Society received 90 reports of a “fireball event” in south central British Columbia and southern Alberta. Witnesses saw a green streak followed by a fireball.

Comment by Scott on January 22, 2018 at 6:16am

American Meteor Society received over 30 reports of a fireball seen over Colorado around 6:09am local time on Tuesday, January 16th, 2018.

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjWXdtRqGAU]

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50aHRrDRqZQ]

American Meteor Society report

https://www.amsmeteors.org/members/imo_view/event/2018/177

Comment by Howard on January 21, 2018 at 6:02pm

AMS Reports Significant Increase of Fireball Events Since 2010 (Jan 20) 

The frequency of meteor fireball events is on the rise according to the American Meteor Society.

A graphic representation shows a nearly linear increase in the number of fireballs reported since 2010.

While it is true that smart phone and cell phone (with camera) ownership has increased over the past 10 years or so, this increase does not account for the increase over the same time period in reports of such sightings made directly to local law enforcement (camera phone ownership has no impact on a person's ability or inclination to report such events to the police). The camera phone ownership increase is therefore correlated with wider reporting on such events, not with the frequency of the events themselves.

Another interesting aspect of this is the psychological effect these kinds of events are having on people. Taking their lead from 'experts' who explain this as being due to 'increased observation technologies' - namely cameras and other sensors - people have normalized the meteor fireball phenomenon, absorbing it into their reality as if it was always there. Routinely described in the press as a 'once in a lifetime event', the prevalence of repeated observations of meteor fireballs over the same geographic area, sometimes just months apart, has forced a shift in the narrative towards emphasizing the harmless nature of meteors exploding overhead.

Source

https://www.sott.net/article/374741-Michigan-Meteor-Event-Fireball-...

Comment by M. Difato on January 17, 2018 at 5:40am

VIEW: Map shows people across massive area witnessed bright light, loud explosion

 Hundreds of reports flood in across Metro Detroit

 https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/view-map-shows-people-across-ma...

DETROIT - The International Meteor Organization has received reports across the Midwest about a bright light and loud explosion.

A map posted on the organization's website shows several reports throughout Metro Detroit. There are also reports in West Michigan, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois..."

~

Meteor flash over SE Michigan (Youtube)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=10&v=v_gubdRMFAE

Michigan Meteor Jan 16 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvFcY9rTPx8

~

RAW: Fireball from likely meteor lights up sky

 http://www.mankatofreepress.com/cnhi_network/raw-fireball-from-like...

(RNN) - People in southern Michigan reported a bright light in the night sky, with some reports of shaking buildings.

The fireball was seen in the skies, making a loud sound at about 8:15 p.m. Tuesday in the metro Detroit area, according to the Detroit Free Press.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the boom from the likely meteor registered a 2.0 in magnitude about 7 kilometers from Saint Clair Shores, MI.

The phenomenon was also seen across several states from Wisconsin to Ohio and up into southwestern Ontario, Canada, WOOD reported.

Images of the object were captured above Windsor, Ontario.

The National Weather Service office in Detroit confirmed Tuesday night that the flash was likely a meteor.

"We continue to monitor feeds from astronomical agencies for official confirmation of a meteor," the NWS said.

NASA said a satellite that monitors lightning might have detected the fireball from the likely meteor.

The response to the possible meteor overwhelmed the site of the American Meteor Society.

Ingham County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Managment asked the public in a Facebook post to quit calling 911 about what was likely a fireball from a meteor.

People took to social media to share what they saw.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=6&v=pUBAK_lhuAI

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on January 16, 2018 at 5:56am

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=1...

Spotted over Northland: 'Yellow fireball, tinged with green'

14 Jan, 2018 2:18pm

Residents of a Far North holiday hotspot were treated to a flashy display of space fireworks late last night.

Cable Bay resident Sheryl Day was out on her deck at about 10.45pm when she saw what she described as a "large, intense yellow fireball, tinged with green".

"Out of the corner of my eye, I saw something bright, and as I turned, this great thing, almost like a fireball, just whizzed by.

"While Day frequently sees meteors when gazing at the night sky, these were typically distant and fleeting.

But this object, she said, seemed much closer as it "wooshed down and then just disappeared".

Others from around the area had also noticed the late-night spectacle, she said.

University of Auckland head of physics Professor Richard Easther said meteors were a "reasonably common" sight in our night skies.

"You'd get one of those a day, somewhere on the planet. It's not something that's a huge deal in its own right, but it is an interesting thing."

The most notable such event in recent times was a fireball that lit up the night sky over the North Island on February 11, 2015, as it soared through the air at 20 times the speed of a bullet.

Comment by Scott on January 10, 2018 at 6:50am

American Meteor Society received over 400 reports about a fireball over Manitoba, Canada near the border with Minnesota around 9:25pm local time on January 4, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RsCYSsNHmv4

https://www.amsmeteors.org/members/imo_view/event/2018/43

Comment by Juan F Martinez on January 2, 2018 at 11:22pm
Amazing footage shows meteor flying over Wakefield

Read more at: https://www.wakefieldexpress.co.uk/news/watch-amazing-footage-shows...

Comment by Scott on January 2, 2018 at 3:57am

Very large fireball meteor spotted over United Kingdom at 5:33pm local time on December 31, 2017

United Kingdom Meteor Observation Network received 700+ public reports. Many observers reported green colour and fragmentation at the end. The meteor was apparently moving quite slowly.

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3eZiFzi420]

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXRtde0NePQ]

https://ukmeteornetwork.co.uk/fireballs/new-years-eve-fireball/

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