Weather:

Weather Wobble

Jet Stream tornados

Siberian Freeze Weather Wobble

Wild weather , [2]

Wobble Clouds

Hurricane development

Violent Push

Weather & ocean currents

Europe Weather

Tides and Whirlpools:

Storm Clash whirlpools

Lurch of earth

Tides , [2]

Whirlpools

Wobble Sloshing

 


"We warned at the start of ZetaTalk, in 1995, that unpredictable weather extremes, switching about from drought to deluge, would occur and increase on a lineal basis up until the pole shift. Where this occurred steadily, it has only recently become undeniable. ZetaTalk, and only ZetaTalk, warned of these weather changes, at that early date. Our early warnings spoke to the issue of global heating from the core outward, hardly Global Warming, a surface or atmospheric issue, but caused by consternation in the core. Affected by the approach of Planet X, which was by then starting to zoom rapidly toward the inner solar system for its periodic passage, the core was churning, melting the permafrost and glaciers and riling up volcanoes. When the passage did not occur as expected in 2003 because Planet X had stalled in the inner solar system, we explained the increasing weather irregularities in the context of the global wobble that had ensued - weather wobbles where the Earth is suddenly forced under air masses, churning them. This evolved by 2005 into a looping jet stream, loops breaking away and turning like a tornado to affect the air masses underneath. Meanwhile, on Planet Earth, droughts had become more intractable and deluges positively frightening, temperature swings bringing snow in summer in the tropics and searing heat in Artic regions, with the violence of storms increasing in number and ferocity."

ZETATALK

 

From the ZetaTalk Chat Q&A for February 4, 2012:

 

The wobble seems to have changed, as the temperature in Europe suddenly plunged after being like an early Spring, Alaska has its coldest temps ever while the US and much of Canada is having an extremely mild winter. India went from fatal cold spell to balmy again. Has the Earth changed position vs a vs Planet X to cause this? [and from another] Bitter cold records broken in Alaska - all time coldest record nearly broken, but Murphy's Law intervenes [Jan 30] http://wattsupwiththat.com/2012/01/30/bitter-cold-records-broken-in-alaska Jim River, AK closed in on the all time record coldest temperature of -80°F set in 1971, which is not only the Alaska all-time record, but the record for the entire United States. Unfortunately, it seems the battery died in the weather station just at the critical moment. While the continental USA has a mild winter and has set a number of high temperature records in the last week and pundits ponder whether they will be blaming the dreaded "global warming" for those temperatures, Alaska and Canada have been suffering through some of the coldest temperatures on record during the last week.

There has been no change in the wobble pattern, the wobble has merely become more severe. Nancy noted a Figure 8 format when the Earth wobble first became noticeable, in early 2005, after Planet X moved into the inner solar system at the end of 2003. The Figure 8 shifted along to the east a bit on the globe between 2005 and 2009, (the last time Nancy took its measure) as Planet X came closer to the Earth, encountering the magnetic N Pole with a violent push earlier in the day. But the pattern of the Figure 8 remained essentially the same. So what changed recently that the weather patterns became noticeably different in late January, 2012?

The N Pole is pushed away when it comes over the horizon, when the noon Sun is centered over the Pacific. This regularly puts Alaska under colder air, with less sunlight, and thus the historically low temps there this January, 2012 as the wobble has gotten stronger. But by the time the Sun is positioned over India, the N Pole has swung during the Figure 8 so the globe tilts, and this tilt is visible in the weather maps from Asia. The tilt has forced the globe under the hot air closer to the Equator, warming the land along a discernable tilt demarcation line.

The next loop of the Figure 8 swings the globe so that the N Pole moves in the other direction, putting the globe again at a tilt but this time in the other direction. This tilt is discernable in weather maps of Europe, again along a diagonal line. Depending upon air pressure and temperature differences, the weather on either side of this diagonal line may be suddenly warm or suddenly cold. The tilt and diagonal line lingers to affect much of the US and Canada, but the Figure 8 changes at this point to be an up and down motion, pulling the geographic N Pole south so the US is experiencing a warmer than expected winter under a stronger Sun. Then the cycle repeats, with the magnetic N Pole of Earth pushed violently away again as the Sun is positioned over the Pacific.

 

From the ZetaTalk Chat Q&A for April 6, 2013:

 

Would the Zetas be able to let us know what is causing the early break-up of the Arctic Ice, the ice seems to have taken on a swirling pattern at the same time, would this be wobble related? [and from another] http://www.vancouversun.com/news/national/Canada+Arctic+cracks+spec... The ice in Canada’s western Arctic ripped open in a massive “fracturing event” this spring that spread like a wave across 1,000 kilometres of the Beaufort Sea. Huge leads of water – some more than 500 kilometres long and as much as 70 kilometres across – opened up from Alaska to Canada’s Arctic islands as the massive ice sheet cracked as it was pushed around by strong winds and currents. It took just seven days for the fractures to progress across the entire area from west to east. [and from another] http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=80752&src=iot... A high-pressure weather system was parked over the region, producing warmer temperatures and winds that flowed in a southwesterly direction. That fueled the Beaufort Gyre, a wind-driven ocean current that flows clockwise. The gyre was the key force pulling pieces of ice west past Point Barrow, the northern nub of Alaska that protrudes into the Beaufort Sea.


The Figure 8 formed by the N Pole during the daily Earth wobble has shifted somewhat to the East, due to Planet X positioned more to the right of the Earth during its approach. This was anticipated, and well described in ZetaTalk, the Earth crowding to the left in the cup to escape the approach of Planet X, so the angle between these two planets would change slightly. This shift of the Figure 8 to the East is due to the push against the Earth’s magnetic N Pole occurring sooner each day than prior. Thus instead of occurring when the Sun is high over the Pacific, over New Zealand, it is now occurring when the Sun is high over Alaska. All the wobble points have shifted eastward accordingly.

This has brought a lingering Winter to the western US, and a changed sloshing pattern to the Arctic waters. Instead of Pacific waters being pushed through the Bering Straits into the Arctic when the polar push occurs, the wobble is swinging the Arctic to the right, and then later to the left, creating a circular motion in the waters trapped in the Arctic. Since the Earth rotates counterclockwise, the motion also takes this path. This is yet another piece of evidence that the establishment is hard pressed to explain. They are attempting to ascribe this to high pressure and wind, all of which are not new to the Arctic, but this circular early breakup of ice in the Arctic is new.

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Comment by Derrick Johnson on June 23, 2022 at 6:36am

High altitude tornado confirmed in Utah

INDIAN CANYON, UT. (WHSV) - A rare high altitude tornado has been confirmed by the National Weather Service in Salt Lake City, UT. The storm happened on Sunday morning, June 19, 2022.

The location, Indian Canyon, which is southeast of Salt Lake City.

The elevation of the tornado as it started, an incredible 9,200′. The National Weather Service reports that the tornado started near a mountain summit, moved over a ridgeline and into a valley along Indian Canyon.

The tornado descended from the starting elevation of 9,200′ to about 8,500′ close to a creek.

The NWS notes that the winds increased as the tornado took this path as it went down in elevation. What we know about tornado research in the last 2 decades is that a tornado can intensify traveling down a mountain (or terrain), and can typically weaken traveling up terrain.

So the fact that this tornado intensified as it went down the mountain makes sense. This is called vortex stretching. In fact the tornado quickly intensified leading to significant tree damage.

he tree damage in the photo above is a clear sign of a tornado. You can see how the trees criss cross, there’s not a clear cut straight pattern.

We call this convergent or even chaotic. When trees fall like this, that means it is from a tornado and not straight-line winds.

The path was 2 miles long and the width was nearly 900 yards wide.

This rare high altitude tornado was rated an EF-2 with winds of 125mph. This happened around 9:00 a.m on Fathers Day, and a nearby weather station recorded a gust of 62mph.

Now this did happen in a remote area so thankfully no one was injured.

https://www.whsv.com/2022/06/22/high-altitude-tornado-confirmed-utah/ 

Comment by Derrick Johnson on June 23, 2022 at 6:32am

Powerful storms pound BOTH coasts as woman and her two dogs die in lightning strike while hiking in LA and 70,000 are out of power in Virginia after area is walloped by strong winds

  • Severe thunderstorms struck both the West and East Coast on Wednesday morning, bringing powerful lightning and storm winds that devastated Los Angeles and Central Virginia
  • The LA sheriff's office confirmed a woman and her dogs were struck directly by lightning and killed in the morning while firefighters worked to put out flames caused by the lightning 
  • In Virginia, 70,000 were left without power after dozens of trees were downed by the powerful gusts, which are expected to continue through the East Coast with winds between 60 to 80 mph 
  • The eastern storms came after a heat wave and a cold front collided on Wednesday morning
  • The cold front is coming off the Atlantic in the northeast, pushing to the southwest in the evening causing possible flooding on the East Coast as the storms continue

The National Weather Service had issued an advisory for areas in Southern California on Wednesday, warning residents to seek shelter from the severe weather. 

Beaches in the area were temporarily closed ahead of flood and thunder warnings, with the main areas affected included Long Beach, downtown LA, Glendale, San Gabriel Valley and Antelope Valley. 

 Ryan Kittell, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Oxnard, told the LA Times that lighting remains a high concern among emergency officials after the rain subsides because the subsequent dry ground could become a huge fire threat. 

'In the last hour we've had 208 lightning strikes that have hit the ground in Los Angeles County,' Kittell said. 'Lightning is a very good fire-starting source and the environment is pretty ripe for fire right now,'

Firefighters have already dealt with at least two brush fires in the area, while the Los Angeles National Forest crews said numerous smoke reports have been called in due to the lightning. 

The East Coast is also contending with its own severe storms that will continue throughout the night and into Thursday with winds between 60 to 80 mph are expected. 

Central Virginia was among the hardest hit areas, with 70,000 people losing power in Richmond, Chesterfield, Henrico and Hanover, according to Dominion Energy. 

WTOP's Dave Dildine reported major damage in Fauquier County, where officials said there were more than 50 trees and large branches downed along Interstate 66. 

The devastation comes less than a week after Central Virginia was struck by three tornados, wrecking homes and taking out the power for thousands. 

 Mark and Kim Taylor, of Goochland, told ABC 8 that the scene was 'like a nightmare' as their house was littered with trees that were knocked down following the storms last week. 

'The governor, the president, somebody needs to come down here and give us some help,' Kim said. 'Thirty trees, $20,000 worth of damage.'

A dome of extreme heat that has baked much of the central United States for the past week is expected to collide with a cold front that could bring flash flooding as the blazing temperatures are set to go even higher — with more records predicted to fall today. 

Many Americans across the central United States felt the brunt of the heat wave on the official first day of summer yesterday with temperatures reaching triple digits in some areas. 

And while forecasts indicate that more dangerous heat is expected in some areas this week, as the heat dome moves off to the southeast, temperatures will scale back some on the East Coast with the help of incoming thunderstorms, AccuWeather meteorologists say. 

A cold front coming off the Atlantic Ocean in the northeast will push to the southwest on Wednesday afternoon and into the evening, bringing strong winds, rain and possible flash flooding on the East Coast.

The heaviest line of storms are expected to hit the Washington, D.C. area and parts of the East Coast on Wednesday afternoon into the evening, FOX5 reported, possibly affecting the evening commute. 

The storm system will be moving north to south and with this type of motion, the storm has the distinction of being slow-moving. And with the threat of heavy downpours throughout the evening in some areas, flash flooding is a concern. 

Model projections suggest that scattered areas could see 2-4 inches of rainfall out of the heaviest storms, FOX5 reported. Multiple storms over the same area are also a concern.  

While flash flood watches have not yet been issued, parts of the East Coast region could be covered with one by this evening. 

Those who live in flood-prone areas should take proper precautions, and if driving, remember to 'turn around, don't drown' if you come across any flooded roadways.

Excessive heat is expected to return Thursday to most of the country. High temperatures will range from 5-15 degrees above average for the week, Accuweather reported. 

Cities including Dallas, Oklahoma City, Little Rock, Arkansas, and Shreveport, Louisiana are expected to reach 100 degrees.   

New Orleans could see a 5- to 10-degree spike in high temperatures. The record highs of 101 set in 2009 and 97 set in 2016 could be challenged this coming Friday and Saturday, it was reported. 

'While temperatures and humidity levels ease a bit for the end of the week in parts of the Midwest, more dangerous temperatures and humidity will return by the upcoming weekend,' AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dean DeVore said.

Temperatures in St. Louis Saturday are forecast to possibly break the record of 102 set in 1954. In Nashville, temperatures could surpass the 100 mark set in 1988 on the same day.

People flocked to pools, beaches and cooling centers across the Midwest and South spanning from northern Florida to the Great Lakes over the past week as the heat wave pushed temperatures into the 90s and beyond.

Certain parts of the country, including New Orleans and Mobile, Alabama, reached record-breaking highs over the week-end, surpassing 97F and 100F respectively on Saturday — breaking the 1913 record of 100F in Mobile.

Minneapolis and St. Louis in Minnesota saw local weather reach about 101F Monday (38C), accompanied by high humidity that made conditions feel close to 110F (43C).

The Twin Cities are seeing its roads cave in under the heat and two areas on I-35 in the Minneapolis area are now closed as of a result, according to Kare11.

'MSP has just reached 99[F], which is a new daily record (surpassing the old record of 98 set in 1933)! Let's see if we can hit 100,' the National Weather Service Twin Cities tweeted on Monday. The heat index in the area reached a high of 105F that day.

emperatures reached 108F (42C) in northwest Kansas last Monday. Western parts of the state and the Texas panhandle nearly reached 110 degrees over the week-end.

Last week, The Kansas Department of Health and Environment knew of at least 2,000 cattle deaths due to high temperatures and humidity. 

The deaths represent a huge economic loss because the animals, which typically weigh around 1,500 pounds, are worth around $2,000 per head, spokeswoman for the Kansas Livestock Association Scarlett Hagins said.

Electric companies in the Southeast said they were ready to tackle the second heat wave this week in affected areas as more people are expected to stay indoors and blast their air conditioners.

'This is our 'Super Bowl' that we prepare all year for. We are ready to go!' Tennessee Valley Authority Spokesman Scott Fiedler told CNN in a statement.

Entergy, a power supplier mostly present in states bordering the Gulf of Mexico, said it expects in increase in power in areas across Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Orleans, and Texas, and expects to reach unprecedented energy levels.

Preparing for extreme heat is a process that goes on year-round at Oncor — the largest electric utility company in Texas and the fifth in the entire country. It serves more than 10million Texans.

'Our maintenance strategy department starts looking at data analytics and analyzing areas of vulnerability that we could really be focusing on for summer prep,' said Senior Design Manager and former Assistant District Manager Elizabeth Barrett on the company's website.

'We're looking at any areas that could be overloaded,' she added. 'Overloaded transformers. We're using meter data consistently to look at how those transformers could be affected by the increased load and whether or not those transformers need to be possibly changed out.'

And the worst may be yet to come. Nighttime temperatures have been hotter than previous years as conditions are expected to be around 100F, not providing much of a relief for a good night's sleep.

The heatwave succeeds wide-ranging weather conditions across the counties last week, which saw millions of people struck by triple-digit temperatures and historic flooding in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming and Montana.

Wildfires have also taken place in Arizona and New Mexico, where conditions in the Phoenix are closer to 110F than 100F.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10944011/Storms-pound-coas... 

Comment by Yvonne Lawson on June 22, 2022 at 10:36pm

Italy's Po Valley rations water amid record drought

Italy's rich northern Lombardy region prepared to declare a state of emergency Thursday over a record drought which is threatening crops and has forced towns in the Po Valley to ration water.

"It's an extremely delicate situation," regional chief Attilio Fontana told reporters as the valley, which stretches across the north and houses a crucial agricultural sector, suffered its worst drought in 70 years.

Fontana said a state of emergency was likely to be declared for Lombardy, home to Milan, as well as three other neighbouring regions: Piedmont, the Veneto and Emilia Romagna.

The Po River is Italy's largest reservoir of freshwater and much of it is used by farmers. Some areas have been without rain for over 110 days, according to the Po River observatory.

With no rain forecast, councils have begun installing water tankers and imposing hosepipe pans.

Utilitalia, a federation of water companies, has asked mayors in 100 towns in Piedmont and 25 in Lombardy to suspend night time drinking water supplies to replenish reservoir levels.

The drought is putting over 30 percent of national agricultural production and half of livestock farming in the valley at risk, Italy's largest agricultural association, Coldiretti, said Thursday.

The low level of the Po is also leading to salt seawater infiltration into low-lying agricultural areas, compounding farmers' problems, it said.

Source:  https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Italys_Po_Valley_rations_water_a...

Map of area covered:

Comment by Derrick Johnson on June 20, 2022 at 8:04am

Kitesurfer is killed and eight are injured after sudden 'mini TORNADO' hits Normandy beach throwing 31-year-old into a restaurant window

  • Five people have been hospitalised and one killed after strong winds in France 
  • A Kite surfer died after gale threw him into a restaurant window on the seafront
  • The Normandy coast in the town of Villers-sur-Mer received little warning of what French media called a 'mini tornado' coming from the English Channel

A thirty-one-year-old kite surfer died Saturday night in Villers-sur-Mer along the Normandy coast in France when he was thrown against the window of a restaurant by a sudden gust of wind.

The strong gales hospitalised five people along with the kite surfer who died upon impact of the building on the seafront.

On the Normandy coast, a massive blast of cold air from the English Channel led to three additional light injuries on June 18.

Another person, reported missing at sea, was later found. 

French media described the wind as a 'mini tornado', adding that meteorologists had not predicted the winds to be so strong.

Footage shows strong winds kicking up clouds of sand and forcing beach attendants to fold up towels and umbrellas.

Chairs and tables on terraces or in gardens were thrown as the sand whirled.

Thierry Granturco, the mayor of Villers-sur-Mer, called the winds a 'violence as we have never known on our coast'.

The winds lasted 20-25 minutes on the Côte Fleurie (Flowery Coast) between Ouistreham and Deauville.

This unexpected weather phenomenon and not announced by Météo-France, the organisation which monitors weather events. 

'It blew more and more violently and it ended with a mini tornado,' said Granturco on Sunday, speaking to franceinfo. 'We had a communication with Météo France who had informed us that they had not been able to anticipate this kind of mini tornado.'

He added: 'We knew we were going to have strong winds, they were announced at the very end of the evening, or even in the night, but we did not think that they would be of this violence.'

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10931701/Kitesurfer-killed... 

Comment by Derrick Johnson on June 16, 2022 at 6:06am

Utah’s weather has been weird this month. Here’s why.

The state’s temperature roller coaster isn’t over yet.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Spring blossoms along Main Street in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, April 28, 2021. Utah has been in for a weird-weather June. The state’s temperatures have climbed to near-record highs, only to plummet to well below normal before shooting back up again.
(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Spring blossoms along Main Street in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, April 28, 2021. Utah has been in for a weird-weather June. The state’s temperatures have climbed to near-record highs, only to plummet to well below normal before shooting back up again.

If you think Utah’s roller-coaster weather has been kind of weird over the last few weeks, you’re not wrong.

The state’s temperatures have climbed to near-record highs, only to plummet to well below normal before shooting back up again.

“We typically go into our driest, quietest pattern in mid- to late June,” Christine Kruse, a lead meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Salt Lake City, said. “It’s starting to get to where it’s really more unusual.”

This June has definitely not been a “quiet” weather month. A week ago, Salt Lake City temperatures sat in the low 90s, about 10 degrees above normal. Last weekend, it hit 97 on Friday and Saturday, 15 degrees above normal. And on Sunday, Salt Lake City set a new record for June 12 with a high of 102 — 19 degrees above normal.

Then a cold front blew in, and temperatures nosedived that night by more than 30 degrees. Monday’s high was 71 (12 degrees below normal) and Tuesday’s high was 69 (14 degrees below normal).

(National Weather Service) Temperatures are expected to climb well above normal on Thursday.

The roller coaster ride isn’t over. After highs in the mid-70s on Wednesday (about 10 degrees below normal), temperatures will shoot up into the mid-90s on Thursday and Friday (about 10 degrees above normal).

On Saturday, the forecast high will dip to 89 degrees, before dropping to 81 on Sunday and 76 on Monday — again 10 degrees below normal. And there’s a slight chance of rain on Saturday and Sunday.

“That’s pretty unusual for late June,” Kruse said. “And it’s unusual to have those temperatures and storms this far south. … This is typically the driest time of the year for the state of Utah.”

The National Weather Service’s models do not indicate that a high pressure system will set up shop over Utah in the next week. So it won’t rain for days and days, “but we’re also not going to have our typical weather for this time of year — hot for days and days,” Kruse said. “I don’t see that.”

The jet stream hasn’t affected southern Utah as much as northern Utah, but temperatures there have bounced up and down, too, with multiple daily highs hovering below normal. That’s expected to continue.

In St. George, the forecast high is 101, 99, 91, 87 and 90 degrees on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday, respectively. Normal highs for this time of year are 97-98.

There’s no rain in the forecast, but patchy, blowing dust is expected Friday.

There is a chance of rain in southeastern Utah on Friday and Saturday, and, looking further ahead — July 22-28 — Kruse said the National Weather Service’s models indicate that “the odds are tilted toward above-normal precipitation” in that part of the state.

“And in far northwestern Utah, the odds are more favorable for below-normal precipitation,” Kruse said. “That’s indicative that, potentially, the monsoon might be starting up just a little bit early.”

In which case, southern Utah can expect more rain than northern Utah.

https://www.sltrib.com/news/2022/06/15/utahs-weather-has-been/ 

Comment by Derrick Johnson on June 16, 2022 at 6:02am

Yellowstone faces 'INDEFINITE' closure after once-in-thousand year flooding forced a state of emergency and destroyed roads, bridges and homes and even the course of two rivers

  • More than 10,000 visitors have evacuated from Yellowstone as unprecedented flooding tore through the northern half of the nation's oldest national park, washing out bridges and roads 
  • Remarkably, no one was reported injured or killed. The only visitors left in the massive park straddling three states were a dozen campers still making their way out of the backcountry
  • Yellowstone National Park, which celebrates its 150th anniversary this year, could remain closed for as long as a week, and northern entrances may not reopen this summer at all
  • Officials warned on Tuesday that local drinking water has become unsafe, and to be on alert for displaced wildlife 
  • Yellowstone River hit historic levels after days of rain and rapid snowmelt and wrought havoc across parts of southern Montana and northern Wyoming
  • Cabins were washed away, small towns were swamped and knocked out power
  • The floods hit the park just as a summer tourist season that draws millions of visitors was ramping up

ellowstone National Park could be closed 'indefinitely' as devastating flooding continues to ravage the towns, roads, and bridges along the Yellowstone River.

Park officials characterized the severe flooding tearing through the region as a once in a 'thousand-year event,' that could alter the course of the Yellowstone river and surrounding landscapes forever.

Officials say that the river's volume is flowing 20,000 cubic feet per second faster than the previous record measured in the 90s.

10,000 tourists were evacuated - including a dozen trapped campers who were rescued by helicopter - emptying the park completely of all visitors.

Officials warned on Tuesday that local drinking water has become unsafe, and to be on alert for displaced wildlife. 

All entrances to the park were closed on Tuesday, and though park services say some southern roads may open in a week, they predicted that the northern roads will be closed through the fall. 

Houses in surrounding communities have been flooded or washed away by streams that turned into raging rivers, roads have been carved away, and bridges have collapsed into the torrent.

The Governor of Montana, Greg Gianforte, declared a statewide disaster. 

All park entrances and roads are temporarily closed due to extremely hazardous conditions from recent flooding,' reads a warning at the top of Yellowstone National Park's website, 'The backcountry is also closed at this time.'

In a statement issued Tuesday on its website, the park warned that its northern portion likely to remain closed for a 'substantial length of time,' citing the severe damages to vital infrastructures within the park.

The statement describes lengths of road that are 'completely gone,' and will require extensive time and effort to repair or rebuild entirely. 

'It is probable that road sections in northern Yellowstone will not reopen this season due to the time required for repairs,' the update read. 

The statement noted that roads in the southern section of the park appeared to be less damaged, and that authorities would be assessing that damage to determine when a reopening might be possible. 

Officials have characterized the unprecedented flooding as a once in a millennium occurrence.  

'This isn't my words, but I've heard this is a thousand-year event,' said Cam Sholly, the superintendent of Yellowstone.  

 Sholly noted that the river's volumetric flow has shattered recorded records by a staggering level as of last weekend.  

'From what I understand, one of the highest cubic feet per second ratings for the Yellowstone River recorded in the '90s was at 31,000 CFS, and Sunday night we were at 51,000 CFS.'

Sholly also pointed out that historic weather events 'seem to be happening more and more frequently.'

All tourists were ordered out of the park, as rockslides rained down on roads, mudslides slid down valleys, and the raging river pulled landscapes, bridges and buildings alike into its torrent. 

 'It is just the scariest river ever,' Kate Gomez of Santa Fe, New Mexico, said Tuesday. 'Anything that falls into that river is gone.'

12 backpackers remained in the park's back-country after the closure, and were eventually evacuated by a Montana National Guard helicopter. 

Comment by KM on June 9, 2022 at 6:41pm

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10899773/Marbella-wildfire...

British tourists among thousands evacuated in Spain as 'out of control' wildfire rips through mountains near Marbella after breaking out on estate once owned by Colonel Gaddafi

  • Benahavis, a small village in hills north of Marbella, has been totally evacuated as wildfire blazes in hill nearby
  • 3,000 residents and tourists fled late on Wednesday night as firefighters struggled to control the flames
  • Britons thought to be among those ordered out of their hotels, and told only to take essentials with them 
  • Blaze began on 16-acre estate once owned by Libyan dictator Gaddafi where he planned to build a golf course

Thousands of people including British tourists have been forced to flee a village on Spain's Costa del Sol overnight as a wildfire raged nearby. 

The entire village of Benahavis, located in hills around 10 miles north of Marbella, has been told to evacuate due to a rapidly-spreading wildfire fanned by 25mph winds.

British tourists are thought to be among 3,000 people evacuated so far, with some put up in emergency accommodation in nearby San Pedro de Alcantara.

The blaze is thought to have broken out on a 16-acre estate once owned by Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi, where he once planned to build a golf resort. 
3,000 people - including British tourists - have been evacuated from Benahavis, north of Marbella, due to a wildfire raging in the hills

3,000 people - including British tourists - have been evacuated from Benahavis, north of Marbella, due to a wildfire raging in the hills

Helicopters are being used in a desperate bid to dampen flames in the Sierra Bermeja mountain range in Malaga

Smoke rises over the hills north of Marbella, as a wildfire rages close to the town of Benahavis, which has been evacuated

Smoke rises over the hills north of Marbella, as a wildfire rages close to the town of Benahavis, which has been evacuated

British tourists among thousands evacuated in Spain as wildfire rages
British tourists among thousands evacuated in Spain as 'out of control' wildfire rips through mountains near Marbella after breaking out on estate once owned by Colonel Gaddafi Benahavis, a small village in hills north of Marbella, has been totally evacuated as wildfire blazes in hill nearby 3,000 residents and tourists fled late on Wednesday night as firefighters struggled to control the flames Britons thought to be among those ordered out of their hotels, and told only to take essentials with them Blaze began on 16-acre estate once owned by Libyan dictator Gaddafi where he planned to build a golf course.  Thousands of people including British tourists have been forced to flee a village on Spain's Costa del Sol overnight as a wildfire raged nearby. The entire village of Benahavis, located in hills around 10 miles north of Marbella, has been told to evacuate due to a rapidly-spreading wildfire fanned by 25mph winds. British tourists are thought to be among 3,000 people evacuated so far, with some put up in emergency accommodation in nearby San Pedro de Alcantara. The blaze is thought to have broken out on a 16-acre estate once owned by Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi, where he once planned to build a golf resort. 3,000 people - including British tourists - have been evacuated from Benahavis, north of Marbella, due to a wildfire raging in the hills +20 View gallery 3,000 people - including British tourists - have been evacuated from Benahavis, north of Marbella, due to a wildfire raging in the hills Helicopters are being used in a desperate bid to dampen flames in the Sierra Bermeja mountain range in Malaga +20 View gallery Helicopters are being used in a desperate bid to dampen flames in the Sierra Bermeja mountain range in Malaga Smoke rises over the hills north of Marbella, as a wildfire rages close to the town of Benahavis, which has been evacuated +20 View gallery Smoke rises over the hills north of Marbella, as a wildfire rages close to the town of Benahavis, which has been evacuated

The estate, called La Resinera, was bought by the Libyan Foreign Bank in 1995. 

Gaddafi, captured and killed in October 2011 following the fall of Tripoli to opposition forces, had announced plans to build a golf course and nearly 2,000 homes there. 

But the Spanish government froze his assets in the country, and the real estate project, in March 2011. 

Three firefighters have been injured trying to contain the 'out-of-control' blaze, including one with burns to 25 per cent of his body. 

Police shut the sole road from Benahavis to the coast late Wednesday and drove around with loudspeakers ordering everyone out of their homes and hotels with only their essential belongings. 

Many locals were forced to sleep overnight in their cars.

The forced evacuation is thought to have affected Torre Tremores, the exclusive villa on the outskirts of Benahavis where PM Boris Johnson stayed last year on holiday. 

The army has been brought in to help firefighters tackle the blaze, which has already burnt nearly 5,000 acres of land. 

The wildfire remained 'out of control' this morning although a predicted change in the direction of the wind in the coming hours is expected to improve the situation. 

Benahavis Town Hall tweeted late last night in English and Spanish: 'The village is being evacuated. If there is anyone with mobility problems please call 999. 

'Buses and taxis are available at the entrance to the village for those who require them.' 

Comment by Gerard Zwaan on June 6, 2022 at 12:55pm

Severe thunderstorms, tennis ball-sized hail wreak havoc across France


severe thunderstorms france june 4 2022

Severe thunderstorms brought heavy rain and up to tennis ball-sized hail to France on June 3 and 4, 2022, wreaking havoc in vineyards across large parts of the country, leaving thousands of homes without power, one person dead and 15 injured – two of them seriously.

  • Météo-France issued an Orange severe weather alert for 65 departments on June 4 – for the first time in more than 20 years.
  • Some areas saw a month’s worth of rain in just 12 hours.
  • 50 000 lighting strikes were registered in 24 hours to June 5.
  • Saint Gervais d’Auvergne in Puy de Dôme recorded winds of 106km/h (66 mph).

A woman died after being trapped under a car by flash waters caused by a storm in the northern city of Rouen, the mayor’s office announced.1

In the Landes and Gers region of southwest France, hailstones bigger than golf balls crashed down on parts of the Armagnac vineyard, affecting tens of thousands of hectares.

“In the vineyards, there is nothing left, the roof of our agricultural building is a giant Swiss cheese, and in the house, the windows are broken,” wine grower Nelly Lacave from the Landes region told AFP. “My father, who is almost 70 years old, has never seen this,” she added.

In Loir-et-Cher, central France, 30 000 scouts who gathered for a camping trip over the Pentecost holiday weekend had to be rushed to safety, many of them inside the local chateau.


Météo-France reported some areas saw a month’s worth of rain in just 12 hours to 06:00 LT on June 5, including 74 mm (2.91 inches) in Saint Yan (Saône et Loire) – normal June rainfall, 57 mm (2.2 inches) in Vichy (Allier) – 3/4 of normal June rainfall, and 54 mm (2.1 inches) in St Didier en Donjoj (Allier) – representing around 3/4 of the usual June rainfall.

Roads and streets were flooded up and down the country, including in areas of the capital, Paris, and in the northern departments of Yvelines, Seine-Maritime, Eure and Eure-et-Loir.2

Authorities warned that levels of the Eure River are dangerously high in Eure-et-Loir while local media reported that 2 bridges over the river in the Mayenne department were washed away.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin said one person died in flood waters in Rouen. 15 people were injured, of which 2 seriously.

Météo-France said very intense electrical activity accompanied the storms, with around 50 000 lightning strikes on the ground in 24 hours, including ~41 000 in just 12 hours.

Saint Gervais d’Auvergne (Puy de Dôme) recorded winds of 106 km/h (65.8 mph), Montbeugny (Allier) and Chalmazel Jeansagnière (Loire) 104 km/h (64.6 mph) and Saint André en Terre Plaine (Yonne) 103 km/h (64 mph).



References:

1 Storms kill woman, wreak havoc across large parts of France – The Local – June 5, 2022

2 France – One Dead as Fierce Storms Wreak Havoc Across 65 Departments – FloodList – June 5, 2022

Featured image credit: Meteo France

Source: https://watchers.news/2022/06/06/severe-thunderstorms-tennis-ball-s...

Comment by KM on May 23, 2022 at 3:09pm

https://strangesounds.org/2022/05/powerful-derecho-storm-slams-onta...

Powerful derecho storm slams Ontario and Quebec, Canada, killing 5 and leaving trail of destruction

Damaging winds, some as high as 80 mph, raced from the Michigan border all the way to Quebec City causing deaths and injuries and damage.
Ontario and Quebec derecho on May 21 2022 Ontario and Quebec powerful derecho storm on May 21 2022

Five people are reported dead after severe thunderstorms raced through parts of Canada on Saturday, according to Environment Canada.

There were five fatalities reported and a few others injured as a result of the strong winds with this line of thunderstorms,” read a weather summary for Ontario and the National Capital Region. “There was also extensive damage to trees, power lines and buildings. There were also overturned cars reported as well as widespread power outages.

The line of thunderstorms developed near Sarnia, a city in Ontario, late Saturday morning and tracked over southern Ontario towards Ottawa Saturday afternoon, according to Environment Canada.

The storm left more than 350,000 customers without power, and “many power outages continue today,” the agency said Sunday.

Storms also swept through central Quebec on Saturday, resulting in broken tree limbs, uprooted trees, damage to buildings and “more than 500,000 homes without power,” Environment Canada said.

Hydro Quebec said on its website that restoration of service progressed overnight and Sunday morning, and close to 500 crews were mobilized on Sunday.

Comment by KM on May 20, 2022 at 1:04am

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/tornado-saskatchewan-ke...

Saskatchewan

Photos, videos show apparent tornado touch down in southern Sask.

Eyewitnesses say tornado formed suddenly near Keeler, Sask. around 7 p.m. CST

An apparent landspout tornado on the ground south of Keller, Sask. reported on May 17, 2022. 

A landspout tornado appeared to touch down in south central Saskatchewan Tuesday night.

While not confirmed by Environment and Climate Change Canada as of 9 p.m. CST, the tornado was spotted by Rob Been near the village of Keeler—about 45 kilometres northwest of Moose Jaw—around 7 p.m. CST.

Been told CBC News he was taking a post-supper nap when he was awakened by loud thunder. The next thing he knew, a tornado appeared to be forming. 

Unconfirmed tornado near Moose Jaw, Sask.

2 days ago
Duration1:56
There were several eyewitness accounts of an unconfirmed tornado in the Moose Jaw, Sask. area on Tuesday evening.

"You're awestruck at just the sheer power and the volatility of it," said Been.

"The winds came up so quick, the hail came down in a hurry. That thing formed almost out of nowhere."

Environment and Climate Change Canada did not issue a warning for a possible tornado in the area, however a severe thunderstorm warning was in effect at the time. Portions of central and southeastern Saskatchewan were placed under severe thunderstorm watches shortly afterward.

Eric Dykes, a meteorologist with Environment and Climate Change Canada, said the intensity of this storm was unexpected.

"There were no supercell tornadoes in the area at that moment. Radar didn't indicate too much at the time storms were expected, but severe storms were not expected to that degree last night.

Been said he isn't aware of any damage close to his property at this time. He still can't believe how close he was to the storm. 
"Being a truck driver, I've seen tornadoes off the in distance before but never this close," he said. "Kind of as close as I'd like to get, honestly."

Dayle Bueckert also found herself surprisingly close to the storm.

The Saskatchewan farmer was driving with her kids north along Highway 2 from Moose Jaw when she spotted the apparent landspout tornado.

"It formed right in front of me and I was like, 'whoa, this is crazy,'" she said. "I wasn't going to stay in the storm so I continued driving ... I only got mostly rain and hail."

Bueckert said hail varying between pea to nickle size fell at their home near Eyebrow.

As for damage, Bueckert and her husband are planning to assess their recently-seeded canola farm near Keeler Wednesday morning. 

Meteorologist Dykes also received reports to Environment and Climate Change Canada.

"We did get one report that was called in to us, a gentleman said that he did see it. And he believes that he saw it on the ground for about 15 minutes." 

Dykes says they will be looking for more eye-witness reports of the possible tornado before they classify it. He encourages people to come forward with their photos and videos. He says so far there have been no reports of injuries or fatalities associated with this weather event. 

If confirmed, Tuesday's landspout tornado could be the first reported in Saskatchewan in 2022.

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