"Of course all volcanoes will explode, as this is going to be a very severe pole shift. What about the months and years preceding the pole shift? It is no secret that Mammoth Lake and the caldera of Yellowstone are warming up, and the populace has been prepared for these occurrences by the movie Volcano where there, in the middle of LA, lava is bubbling up. In fact, there is a fault line running from the approximate San Diego/LA area, up into the Sierras, and this is liable to rupture rather violently during one of the quakes that precedes the pole shift by some months. Volcanic eruptions from that area in the Sierras can be expected. Will Mount St. Helen erupt? All volcanoes that have been active within the memory of man will begin spewing and burping and oozing, and many that were not expected to become active will reactive. "   ZetaTalk

 

 

I will try to update this post daily with new volcano news starting from August 2011.

 

 

- Volcanic activities on the map (March 2012)


Currently active volcanoes visual (Sep 28)


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Comment by jorge namour on November 29, 2013 at 10:52am

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Etna eruption with strong explosions scary: trembles even Calabria! The images LIVE

Is intensifying eruption of Etna that continues to become more than 3 hours, with high lava fountains, impressive explosions and volcanic tremor that is surpassing even the levels reached crazy Saturday morning. This eruption, in fact, it seems even more intense than that on the sabbath, the explosions are very strong, and are felt even in southern Calabria , where the earth trembles as if there was an earthquake.

http://translate.google.com.ar/translate?sl=it&tl=en&js=n&a...

https://www.facebook.com/VolcanoMonitor

http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/etna/current-activity.html

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=687708964597129&set=a.5...

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on November 26, 2013 at 6:01pm

http://www.altheadlines.com/nibiru-causing-recent-volcano-activity-...

NIBIRU CAUSING RECENT VOLCANO ACTIVITY??? (10 MAJOR VOLCANOES!)

By: David Veritas Contributor Profile | More Stories

Nibiru causes ring of fire volcano eruptionsMany researchers are worried and trying to figure out why 10 major volcanoes along the ring of fire have suddenly come to life. Although it is not rare to have a few active at the same time, but 10 at the same time is highly unusual and causing quite a bit of concern.

Some Nibiru trackers are reporting this could be evidence of Nibiru’s proximity to our planet and the gravitational effects it is causing as it pull on Earth. Increased volcanic activity is one of the symptoms that many have been predicting would occur as planet Nibiru nears our solar system.

They also point to how mainstream media is all but silent on this phenomenon which could be to keep people from looking to closely at what might be the real cause of this out of the ordinary volcano activity.

For more on the 10 Major Volcanoes Coming To Life:

WHY HAVE 10 MAJOR VOLCANOES ALONG THE RING OF FIRE SUDDENLY ROARED TO LIFE

Volcano Raises New Island of Japans Coast

Another extremely rare occurance happening along with the recent increased volcanic activity is that a volcano off the coast of Japan is actually creating a new island. The birth of a new island is extremely rare and hasn’t been seen in decades in these parts.

http://www.altheadlines.com/why-have-10-major-volcanoes-along-the-r...

WHY HAVE 10 MAJOR VOLCANOES ALONG THE RING OF FIRE SUDDENLY ROARED TO LIFE

By: TheEconomicCollapseBlog 

Ring Of FireTen major volcanoeshave erupted along the Ring of Fire during the past few months, and the mainstream media in the United States has been strangely silent about this.  But this is a very big deal.  We are seeing eruptions at some volcanoes that have been dormant for decades.  Yes, it is certainly not unusual for two or three major volcanoes along the Ring of Fire to be active at the same time, but what we are witnessing right now is highly unusual.  And if the U.S. media is not concerned about this yet, the truth is that they should be.  Approximately 90 percent of all earthquakes and approximately 80 percent of all volcanic eruptions occur along the Ring of Fire, and it runs directly up the west coast of the United States.  

Perhaps if Mt. Rainier in Washington state suddenly exploded or a massive earthquake flattened Los Angeles the mainstream media would wake up.  Most Americans have grown very complacent about these things, but right now we are witnessing volcanic activity almost everywhere else along the Ring of Fire.  It is only a matter of time before it happens here too.

Sadly, most Americans cannot even tell you what the Ring of Fire is.  The following is howWikipedia defines the “Ring of Fire”…

The Ring of Fire is an area where a large number of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur in the basin of the Pacific Ocean. In a 40,000 km (25,000 mi) horseshoe shape, it is associated with a nearly continuous series of oceanic trenches, volcanic arcs, and volcanic belts and/or plate movements.  It has 452 volcanoes and is home to over 75% of the world’s active and dormant volcanoes.

An easy way to think about the Ring of Fire is to imagine a giant red band stretching along the perimeter of the Pacific Ocean.

And yes, that includes the entire west coast of the United States and the entire southern coast of Alaska.

10 major volcanoes along the Ring of Fire have suddenly roared to life in recent months.  The following are short excerpts from news reports about those eruptions…

Volcano creates new island off the coast of Japan: A dramatic volcanic eruption in the Pacific Ocean has created a tiny new islet in Japan’s territorial waters, officials said Thursday, the first time in decades the nation has seen the phenomenon.

The navy spotted smoke about 1,000 kilometres (600 miles) south of Tokyo on Wednesday and Japan’s coastguard later verified the birth of the islet around the Ogasawara island chain.

Video footage showed plumes of smoke and ash billowing from the 200-metre island, and Japan’s coastguard said it was warning vessels to use caution in the area until the eruption cools off.

Mount Sinabung in Indonesia: A volcano in western Indonesia has erupted eight times in just a few hours, “raining down rocks” over a large area and forcing thousands to flee their homes, officials said Sunday.

Mount Sinabung has been erupting on and off since September, but went into overdrive late Saturday and early Sunday, repeatedly spewing out red-hot ash and rocks up to eight kilometres (five miles) into the air.

Colima in Mexico: On Monday night and Tuesday morning, the Colima volcano showed two strong exhalations; ejecting lava down its slopes and ash skyward, that has reached several villages. Since last Sunday, the Volcan de Fuego de Colima was reactivated after several weeks of apparent calm and until Tuesday registered between 30 and 35 puffs per day, spewing lava down its slopes and ash that reached the people of Cheese, municipality of Cuauhtémoc, Colima, and some towns in the state of Jalisco.

Sakurajima in Japan: After a short phase of weaker activity, the volcano began to erupt more violently yesterday with a series of powerful explosions that sent ash plumes up to 15,000 ft (4,5 km). Near-constant ash emissions have been taking place from the Showa crater.

Fuego in Guatemala: Two lava flows are active on the upper slopes of the volcano at the moment, to the Taniluya (south) and Ceniza canyon (SE). The effusive activity started on 11 Nov and increased on 18 November, reaching a length of 600 m. Constant avalanches detach from the flow fronts.  At the same time, explosive activity at the summit crater remained at low to moderate levels, with strombolian explosions that produce ash plumes of up to 800 m height and incandescent jets visible from distance.

Santa María/Santiaguito in Guatemala: A phreatomagmatic (water-magma interaction driven) explosion yesterday morning produced a plume of fine ash rising to 3.2 km altitude (700 m above the lava dome) and drifted SE, causing ash fall in Finca La Florida.

Yaser in Vanuatu: Geohazards reports that the volcano continues to produce near-continuous ash emissions while explosions are relatively weak. This phase of ash emissions began on 3 November and are likely to continue into the coming days and weeks.

Popocatepetl in Mexico: The Popocatepetl volcano showcased with a layer of snow was observed throughout the morning and mid-day from the city of Puebla and columns generated by medium-intensity exhalations. According to the monitoring system of the National Center for Disaster Prevention (Cenapred) in the last 24 hours, the colossus presented 57 exhalations of low intensity, probably accompanied by emissions of steam and gas.

Mount Marapi in Indonesia: Mount Merapi, the most active volcano in Indonesia, erupted earlier Monday, shooting a cloud of black ash about 2,000 meter high, officials said.

Kliuchevskoi on the Kamchatka PeninsulaKliuchevskoi on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia had a busy weekend after its busy week — and a lot of the action was caught on the webcams pointed at the volcano or by satellite. For much of Friday and into Saturday (October 18-19), the volcano continued to produce some vigorous lava fountains and lava flows, mixed in with Strombolian explosions that sent bombs down the slopes of the volcano. This activity was significant enough to cause some aviation alerts even over the western Aleutian Islands.

So why is this happening?

Why is the Ring of Fire suddenly roaring to life?

And what could this mean for the United States?

Comment by Howard on November 26, 2013 at 5:44am

Mt Etna Showers Sicily in Volcanic Rock (Nov 23)

Mt Etna's latest eruption rained rocks on homes and cars in the Sicilian town of Giardini-Naxos.

People have been putting up umbrellas to protect themselves from the shower of volcanic rock.

The cloud of ash turned the sky black - and the stones which fell were bigger than any seen before.

Source

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2513085/Mount-Etna-erupts-s...

Comment by Howard on November 24, 2013 at 6:37am

Thousands Flee as Indonesia's Sinabung Volcano Erupts 8 Times in a Few Hours (Nov 24)

Sinabung volcano in western Indonesia erupted 8 times in just a few hours, raining down rocks over a large area and forcing thousands to flee their homes, officials said on Sunday.

Mount Sinabung has been erupting on and off since September, but went into overdrive this weekend, repeatedly spewing out red-hot ash and rocks up to eight kilometres into the air.

Powerful bursts of hot ash and gravel erupted from a rumbling volcano in western Indonesia early Monday, sending panicked villagers streaming down the sides of the mountain.

6 new eruptions early Monday morning (Nov 25) sent lava and searing gas tumbling up to 1.5 kilometres down the slopes. Volcanic material spewed as high as 2,000 metres into the air a day after authorities had raised the volcano's alert status to the highest level.

About 15,000 people have been evacuated from 17 villages, packed into crowded government camps away from the danger zone five kilometres around the crater, The evacuation zone was expanded from three kilometres on Monday, Nov 25.. 

Thick, gray ash covered villages, farms and trees as far as 70 kilometres north of Mount Sinabung's crater, hitting the towns of Binjai and Langkat.

"Everything turned hot surrounding us," said Jatah Surbakti, a 45-year-old farmer who fled with his wife and four children to a shelter on trucks provided by the local disaster agency, along with hundreds other villagers.

"We were running in panic under the rain of ash and gravel ... I heard many women and children screaming and crying," he said, adding that his fruit and vegetable farms were destroyed by the ash and his children's schools were disrupted.

Sources

http://www.straitstimes.com/breaking-news/se-asia/story/thousands-f...

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/thousands-flee-as/8...

http://www.enca.com/world/multiple-volcanic-eruptions-force-indones...

http://news.sky.com/story/1173013/sinabung-thousands-flee-volcano-e...

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/asia-pacific/2013/11/thousands-flee-f...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/indonesia-s-mount-sinabung-volcano-eru...

Comment by jorge namour on November 23, 2013 at 11:34am

Saturday november 23 2013

ETNA- SICILY ITALY

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Volcano-Planet/358876530789142

Another webcam shot of Etna's paroxysm going on right now

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=632867933441925&set=gm....

Big one going on at Etna right now!

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=632864216775630&set=gm....

Comment by Janek Stokłosa on November 22, 2013 at 10:26am

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Seven Volcanoes In Six Different Countries All Start Erupting Withi...

Chris Carrington
Activist Post

A new island has appeared in the Pacific. A submarine eruption just off Nishino-Shima Island Japan has erupted for the first time in 40 years. The Japanese Navy noticed the explosions as boiling lava met sea water giving rise to plumes of steam and ash.

Almost 7,000 miles away in Mexico, the Colima volcano blew its top after a period of relative calm. A steam and ash cloud rose two miles into the sky and the grumbling of the mountain could be heard in towns a few miles away.

In Guatemala the ‘Fire Mountain’ belched out lava and sent up a moderate ash cloud causing an ash fall over nearby towns. The explosions and shock waves occurring in the volcano can be felt by residents over 6 miles away. Doors and windows are reported to be rattling, but there has been no damage so far.

In Vanuatu the Yasur volcano is giving some cause for concern. Although the explosions are quite weak the continuous ash that is coming from the mountain is starting to build up on farming land.

Over to Italy, Mount Etna is putting on quite a display. The current eruption started a few days ago and has been getting stronger as time moves on. A massive eruption lit up the sky and disturbed residents yesterday. The ash cloud was high enough to see flights canceled. The lava flow was the biggest in years, and the town of Zafferana which lay in its path saw some damage. Lava diverters were put into place, and most of the town escaped unscathed.

In Indonesia a four mile high ash cloud is making life hard for residents. Mount Sinabung came back to life in 2010 after dormancy of hundreds of years. Occasionally coming to life after its 2010 awakening, the rumbling of the volcano prompted the evacuation of over 6000 people as scientists feared a major eruption. There has been no lava flows so far but the ash cloud is growing.

Still in Indonesia but on the island of Java this time, Mount Merapi exploded yesterday. Hundreds of people were killed when it last erupted in 2010. There is no news of casualties at this point.

So, we have eruptions big enough to prompt evacuations. Flights are canceled, and a new island pops up off the coast of Japan. I would have called that newsworthy myself but obviously I’m wrong. If I was right it would have been common knowledge right? Reports may have been on the news right?

So many volcanoes throwing so much gas, ash and particulates into the air can have an effect on climate, this is a scientific fact. I’m not saying that these volcanoes herald the start of a new ice age but the planet certainly seems to be getting a bit more active of late.

Continued large eruptions put a huge amount of particulate matter into the atmosphere, and these particles reflect sunlight away from earth and when there is enough of them the temperatures can drop.

The Mount Pinatubo eruption lowered temperatures by around 0.5°C across the Northern Hemisphere.

Considering that we are in a cooling period anyway, having so many volcanoes going off at the same time is not good. Aside from the devastating effects the lava and ash can have on the lives of those living near to them, the global impacts can be enormous.

Lost crops due to ash fall and lower temperatures can lead to hunger and famine, as happened after the Tambora eruption in 1815.

Economic losses due to lost crops and canceled flights runs into millions of dollars a day, as with the Icelandic eruption of Eyjafjallojkull (pronounced: aya fiat la u cud la) in 2010.

The spasms of the earth come without warning, but at the same time those spasms should be a wake up call to all of us that change can happen in the blink of an eye.

Better be prepared for it.

Comment by Howard on November 21, 2013 at 6:49am

Mexico’s Colima Volcano Erupts (Nov 18)
On Monday night and Tuesday morning, Mexico's Colima volcano re-awakened with two powerful eruptions, spilling lava down its slopes and spewing ash that reached several villages including Cheese, the municipality of Cuauhtémoc, Colima, and some towns in the state of Jalisco.  From the city of Colima there was a big cloud of steam that rose to just over 2 miles.

Source (translated)

http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/estados/2013/colima-volcan-fuego-ceni...

Comment by Kojima on November 21, 2013 at 1:16am

Nishima-Shima volcano (Japan): submarine volcanic eruption gives bi... [Volcano Discovery; 20 November, 2013]

Nishima-Shima volcano (Japan): submarine volcanic eruption gives birth to new island

A new island was born today in the Pacific Ocean in Japan's Izu (or Volcano) island chain. It is produced by a new submarine eruption which is currently taking place about 500 m southeast of Nishino-Shima island. 

The eruption was first spotted by Japanese navy this morning at 10:20 (local time) who documented surtseyan activity at the eruption site (explosive interaction of sea-water and lava, generating violent jets of steam and ash). It appears that the eruption has already built an island of about 200 m diameter in size, which suggests that the vent was already located in very shallow waters. 

A small steam and ash plume rising to about 2000 ft (600 m) was reported by VAAC Tokyo. The last known eruption of the volcano occurred in 1973 .

Comment by jorge namour on November 20, 2013 at 6:14pm

Posted by Ren on November 20, 2013

https://www.facebook.com/VolcanoMonitor

Eruption has occurred on Nishinoshima in the ironically named Volcano Islands off Japan

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Volcano-Planet/358876530789142

http://www.volcanoplanet.co.uk/apps/blog/show/36501529-eruption-nea...

Eruption near Japanese island

It has been reported that an eruption had occurred on Nishino-shima in the Volcano Islands in the Pacific Ocean. At around 10:00 the Japanese Maritime Self-Defence Force discovered an ash plume rising from the area and at approximately 16:00 the Japanese Coast Guard confirmed that a black plume has been rising from a new island (about 200m in diameter) around 500m to the southeast of Nishino-shima. The last eruption of Nishino-shima came in 1973-1974 when an eruption merged a few islands into one.

Eruption plume seen rising from a newly formed island close to Nishino-shima. PHOTO SOURCE: Japanese Coast guard.

Comment by jorge namour on November 19, 2013 at 2:11pm

Nov 17, 2013

Volcano discovered smoldering under a kilometer of ice in West Antarctica

http://phys.org/news/2013-11-volcano-smoldering-kilometer-ice-west....

http://www.earth-of-fire.com/pages/antarctica-a-new-active-volcano-...

In January 2010 a team of scientists had set up two crossing lines of seismographs across Marie Byrd Land in West Antarctica. It was the first time the scientists had deployed many instruments in the interior of the continent that could operate year-round even in the coldest parts of Antarctica.

Like a giant CT machine, the seismograph array used disturbances created by distant earthquakes to make images of the ice and rock deep within West Antarctica.

In the meantime, automated-event-detection software was put to work to comb the data for anything unusual.

When it found two bursts of seismic events between January 2010 and March 2011, Wiens' PhD student Amanda Lough looked more closely to see what was rattling the continent's bones.

Was it rock grinding on rock, ice groaning over ice, or, perhaps, hot gases and liquid rock forcing their way through cracks in a volcanic complex?

Uncertain at first, the more Lough and her colleagues looked, the more convinced they became that a new volcano was forming a kilometer beneath the ice.

The discovery of the new as yet unnamed volcano is announced in the Nov. 17 advanced online issue of Nature Geoscience.

In 2010 many of the instruments were moved to West Antarctica and Wiens asked Lough to look at the seismic data coming in, the first large-scale dataset from this part of the continent.

"I started seeing events that kept occurring at the same location

youngest ones."

The events were weak and very low frequency, which strongly suggested they weren't tectonic in origin. While low-magnitude seismic events of tectonic origin typically have frequencies of 10 to 20 cycles per second, this shaking was dominated by frequencies of 2 to 4 cycles per second.

But glacial processes can generate low-frequency events. If the events weren't tectonic could they be glacial?

To probe farther, Lough used a global computer model of seismic velocities to "relocate" the hypocenters of the events to account for the known seismic velocities along different paths through the Earth. This procedure collapsed the swarm clusters to a third their original size.

It also showed that almost all of the events had occurred at depths of 25 to 40 kilometers (15 to 25 miles below the surface). This is extraordinarily deep—deep enough to be near the boundary between the earth's crust and mantle, called the Moho, and more or less rules out a glacial origin.

It also casts doubt on a tectonic one. "A tectonic event might have a hypocenter 10 to 15 kilometers (6 to 9 miles) deep, but at 25 to 40 kilometers, these were way too deep," Lough says.

A colleague suggested that the event waveforms looked like Deep Long Period earthquakes, or DPLs, which occur in volcanic areas, have the same frequency characteristics and are as deep. "Everything matches up," Lough says.

The seismologists also talked to Duncan Young and Don Blankenship of the University of Texas who fly airborne radar over Antarctica to produce topographic maps of the bedrock. "In these maps, you can see that there's elevation in the bed topography at the same location as the seismic events," Lough says.

The radar images also showed a layer of ash buried under the ice. "They see this layer all around our group of earthquakes and only in this area," Lough says.

Their best guess is that it came from Mount Waesche, an existing volcano near Mt Sidley. But that is also interesting because scientists had no idea when Mount Waesche was last active, and the ash layer is sets the age of the eruption at 8,000 years ago.

What's up down there?

The case for volcanic origin has been made. But what exactly is causing the seismic activity?

"Most mountains in Antarctica are not volcanic," Wiens says, "but most in this area are. Is it because East and West Antarctica are slowly rifting apart? We don't know exactly. But we think there is probably a hot spot in the mantle here producing magma far beneath the surface."

"People aren't really sure what causes DPLs," Lough says. "It seems to vary by volcanic complex, but most people think it's the movement of magma and other fluids that leads to pressure-induced vibrations in cracks within volcanic and hydrothermal systems."

Will the new volcano erupt?

"Definitely," Lough says. "In fact because of the radar shows a mountain beneath the ice I think it has erupted in the past, before the rumblings we recorded.

Will the eruptions punch through a kilometer or more of ice above it?

The scientists calculated that an enormous eruption, one that released a thousand times more energy than the typical eruption, would be necessary to breach the ice above the volcano.

On the other hand a subglacial eruption and the accompanying heat flow will melt a lot of ice. "The volcano will create millions of gallons of water beneath the ice—many lakes full," says Wiens. This water will rush beneath the ice towards the sea and feed into the hydrological catchment of the MacAyeal Ice Stream, one of several major ice streams draining ice from Marie Byrd Land into the Ross Ice Shelf.

By lubricating the bedrock, it will speed the flow of the overlying ice, perhaps increasing the rate of ice-mass loss in West Antarctica.

"We weren't expecting to find anything like this," Wiens says

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-11-volcano-smoldering-kilometer-ice-west....

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