Sea monster found on the beach of Aberdeen, UK

21.07.11.
20th July 2011

A couple were left shocked when they discovered the rotting body of a sea monster while walking along a beach.

Margaret and Nick Flippence made the incredible find as they exercised their dogs at Bridge of Don,  Aberdeen.

Mr Flippence, 59, who lives nearby, said: 'We were stunned. I thought, "oh my God what is it?"

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2016781/Lock-Ness-Monsters-...

 

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Comment by Caryn D on February 9, 2012 at 1:45am

Wow - thanks Malou for the awesome link to the video of the super-chillin-not-quite-frozen-frill shark - Wikipedia enlightened me further, now here. That's something you don't see every day!!! Sea monsters, indeed!

Comment by Malou (Marie Louise) Geleff on February 5, 2012 at 10:18am

And here´s another one from Iceland of all places, spotted alive and well on February 2nd. this year :

http://www.ruv.is/frett/er-thetta-lagarfljotsormurinn

VIDEO AT LINK !!

Comment by Malou (Marie Louise) Geleff on July 22, 2011 at 9:41am

From the link to Frill Shark, which Howard provided below :

Frill Shark: Loch Ness or Living Fossil?

By Jennifer Viegas
 

In 2007, a fisherman near Tokyo, Japan, told Awashiwa Marine Park officials that he’d just seen a very unusual eel-like creature with needle-sharp teeth. Staff at the park followed the fisherman, who directed them to the 5-foot-long oddity. They caught the creature, which was later identified as a frilled shark. 

The frilled shark has been called everything from a “sea serpent” to a real-life “Loch Ness Monster” over the years in places where it lives, such as southeast Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, West Africa, Chileand the Caribbean. A more accurate nickname is “the living fossil,” since this shark belongs to a primitive species that has changed very little over millions of years. 

"

Comment by Malou (Marie Louise) Geleff on July 22, 2011 at 9:36am

Completely amazing !!!   Yes, Howard´s an expert digger !!  For sure ! 

I, too, would´ve never thought of a shark in that context, but seeing that picture, I can see why - and why I wouldn´t have thought so !  

We´ve been getting stray whales up here in Danish waters and it´s a sensation every time... Nothing yet this year.. 

As we here can´t determine anything, we can still wonder how many more "missing links" might be "out there".

And thanks Kris H for your info on the Chinese Sea Monster : yes, it could´ve been a whale, I guess.. had a much more roundish shape than this one... 

Comment by MegaMontana on July 21, 2011 at 9:54pm

Wow Howard, you're a master of investigation. That seems like a very likely match. If only those teeth were still intact, we'd know 100%, but it looks like the frill shark is a match. Either way, Zetas are right about sea creatures on the move North as the oceans heat from the bottom up.

Comment by Jeagle on July 21, 2011 at 8:12pm

The backbone of this creature looks much like the bones found on Andøya on the coast of northern Norway some years ago. I took care of some of the bones, and had them sent to a monsterhunting friend of mine in Sweden, who in turn had scientist take look at it. Their conclusion was that it was a baskin shark. However; I was not convinced, but we never had the bones or any other part DNA-tested.

The scull and the flesh was gone when I got there, taken by winter storm, local scavengers and souvenir hunters, but what was left had a striking resemblance to the findings in Scotland.

My belief is that this is an unknown species, and maybe a young Nessie, who I believe wanders the oceans like the eel, before it settles in it's native lake to breed..

Comment by Howard on July 21, 2011 at 7:39pm

Shark vertebrae

Comment by BERNADINO on July 21, 2011 at 7:05pm

wow amazing  would a shark look like that dead it looks like it has bone anyway must have been quite a animal either way

Comment by Howard on July 21, 2011 at 6:58pm

Possibly a large Frill Shark, usually found in waters off southeast Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, West Africa, Chile and the Caribbean.

Reiterating MegaMontana's comment:

"As has been noted in recent years, tropical creatures are migrating North along coastlines, and overland, due to the general warming of the crust."  ZetaTalk

Comment by Planet Twelve on July 21, 2011 at 4:22pm

And "Deadliest Catch" has filmed something very interesting in Alaska:

video here

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