Disease outbreaks will increase as per ZetaTalk

 

Taking Sick

On Jan 15, 1998 ZetaTalk stated that Illness will increase as Planet X approaches.  Zetas right again !!!

ZetaTalk: Take Sick, written Feb 15, 1998.
Increasingly, as the pole shift nears, the populace will take sick. This will take the form of known illnesses occurring more frequently, seemingly depressed immune systems, but will also appear as new and puzzling illnesses not seen before in the memory of man. What is going on here?

The changes at the core of the Earth that have resulted in El Nino weather patterns and white buffalo and deformed frogs also affect man. The germs are on the move. Their carriers are on the move. And thus humans are exposed to diseases that are so rare as to be undocumented in medical journals.

You will see increasing illness, odd illnesses, microbes that travel because an insect is scattering about and spreading germs in places where it normally doesn't travel. 90% of all the illness and distress you're going to see is a natural situation, a natural occurrence. Because of the changing, swirling in the core of the Earth, and this will continue to up-tick until the pole shift.

And reiterated in 1999

ZetaTalk: Next 3 1/2 Years, written Sep 15, 1999.
Sickness will slightly increase from where it is today. There is a lot of illness now because people who are already unstable are unable to take the turmoil caused by the increased emanations from the Earth. Some of them have simply sensed what is coming and have decided to die. This is true of animals as well as humans. Sickness will increase, but not to the point where it is going to get exponentially worse.

On Feb 2, 2000 a Washington report confirmed this increase, and published concerns were subsequently reported.

Diseases From Around World Threatening U.S.
Reuters, Feb 2, 2000
30 New Diseases Make Global Debut
At least 30 previously unknown diseases have appeared globally since 1973, including HIV, AIDS, Hepatitis C, Ebola haemorrhagic fever and the encephalitis-related Nipah virus that emerged in Indonesia. Twenty well-known infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, malaria, and cholera have re-emerged or spread since 1973.
  
Is Global Warming Harmful to Health?
Scientific American, August 2000
Notably, computer models predict that global warming, and other climate alterations it induces, will expand the incidence and distribution of many serious medical disorders. Disturbingly, these forecasts seem to be coming true.

And since this time, SARS and increased incidence of flesh eating disease,
and entire cruise ships regularly returning to port with the passengers ill with stomach flu have been reported.
Depressed immune systems?
Zetas RIGHT Again!

After the pole shift, there will be many opportunistic diseases that will afflict mankind. This does not require an imagination, as today they afflict mankind after disasters. The primary affliction will be from sewage laden water, which will pollute the drinking water man is forced to use. We have been adamant about mankind distilling their drinking water after the pole shift for this reason. Distillation removes heavy metals as well as killing microbes by the boiling process. Any disease that flourishes in malnourished bodies and in areas of poor hygiene will take advantage of the pole shift disasters. Scurvy due to lack of Vitamin C will occur, with bleeding gums and even death if not corrected. Many weeds are high in Vitamin C and survivors should arm themselves with knowledge about the vitamin content of weeds. Unprotected sex by survivors either taking advantage of the weak, as in rape, or by simple distraction and grief and a lack of contraceptive devices will spread AIDS and hepatitis. Morgellons, which is caused by a synergy of parasites and microbes when the immune system is low will likely increase. There will be outbreaks of diseases which were endemic in the past, such as small pox or measles, but in those survivor communities where the members have been immunized in the past these will be limited and quarantines can help in this regard.

http://www.zetatalk5.com/ning/20no2010.htm

 

Chile battles youth unrest and typhoid fever outbreak

September 15, 2011SANTIAGOChile’s problems dealing with youth unrest over slow education reforms are being compounded by concerns the capital may be in the grip of a typhoid fever outbreak. The government has battled to enforce restraint on law enforcement agencies amid angry student-led protests, which have disrupted urban centers across the country for more than a month. The reforms demanded by youth groups are nowhere near being implemented and protests continue to simmer with support from teachers and workers unions. Now authorities are faced with the more immediate risk of typhoid. Health authorities issued repeated alerts for tougher hygiene checks and controls after they found several people infected and seriously ill with typhoid in the western metropolitan area of Santiago. At least seven cases were confirmed by the Public Health Institute but there were no immediate reports of fatalities. “Typhoid fever is an acute infectious disease triggered by a salmonella bacteria strain,” Institute Director Maria Teresa Valenzuela said. In most cases the infection is caused by consumption of contaminated food and drink or fruit and vegetables grown in areas where contaminated water is used in irrigation. Typhoid fever produces symptoms of high fever, diarrhea or intense headaches. The Santiago region has been prone to typhoid outbreaks since the 1990s when incidence of the disease caused up to 190 cases a year.

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2011/09/15/chile-battles...

Epidemic Hazard in India on Saturday, 17 September, 2011 at 03:16 (03:16 AM) UTC.

Description
The Department of Health and Family Welfare has informed that it had received a message through telephone on 12th September 2011 of an outbreak of fever of unknown cause leading to three deaths at Poilwa village, Peren District. Immediately the State Rapid Response Team (RRT) of Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP), Nagaland, comprising of Dr. John Kemp (State Surveillance Officer), Dr. Sao Tunyi (Epidemiologist), Dr. Kevisevolie Sekhose (Epidemiologist), and Venezo Vasa (Entomologist) conducted an outbreak investigation at Poilwa village. The team collected three samples from suspected cases out of which all the three were tested positive for Scrub Typhus. Till date, there are 9 cases with 3 deaths. This was stated in a official press note issued by Dr. Imtimeren Jamir, the Principal Director, Directorate of Health & Family Welfare, Kohima. Scrub Typhus is Rickettsial disease caused Orientia tsutsugamushi and transmitted by the bite of mite called Leptotrombidium deliense. In Nagaland, it was formerly detected by IDSP with Central Surveillance Team at Longsa village Mokokchung in 2006, and in Porba village of Phek District in 2007. The State RRT team carried out the outbreak investigation along with doing and entomological survey. The patients were treated with appropriate medicines and awareness and preventive measures were communicated with the villagers. The concerned local health authorities and programs are informed for further necessary action. The mop-up operation is being carried out by the National Vector Borne Disease Control Program.
Biohazard name: Typhus (Scrub)
Biohazard level: 3/4 Hight
Biohazard desc.: Bacteria and viruses that can cause severe to fatal disease in humans, but for which vaccines or other treatments exist, such as anthrax, West Nile virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, SARS virus, variola virus (smallpox), tuberculosis, typhus, Rift Valley fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, yellow fever, and malaria. Among parasites Plasmodium falciparum, which causes Malaria, and Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes trypanosomiasis, also come under this level.
Symptoms: - After bite by infected mite larvae called chiggers, papule develops at the biting site which ulcerates and eventually heals with the development of a black eschar. - Patients develop sudden fever with headache, weakness, myalgia, generalized enlargement of lymph nodes, photophobia, and dry cough. - A week later, rash appears on the trunk, then on the extremities, and turns pale within a few days. - Symptoms generally disappear after two weeks even without treatment. - However, in severe cases with Pneumonia and Myocarditis, mortality may reach 30% Diagnosis - The most commonly used test for diagnosis is Wel-Felix Test, which is available at State IDSP laboratory, Kohima. - More specific serological tests like detection of IgM can also be done for diagnosis.
Status:

confirmed

 

Turns out, the plague isn't just ancient history. New Mexico health officials recently confirmed the first human case of bubonic plague — previously known as the "Black Death" — to surface in the U.S. in 2011. 

An unidentified 58-year-old man was hospitalized for a week after suffering from a high fever, pain in his abdomen and groin, and swollen lymph nodes, reports the New York Daily News. (Officials declined to say when the man was released from the hospital.) A blood sample from the man tested positive for the disease.

http://healthland.time.com/2011/05/10/first-case-of-bubonic-plague-...

Epidemic Hazard in USA on Saturday, 17 September, 2011 at 03:33 (03:33 AM) UTC.

Description
Umatilla County health officials today confirmed a case of plague in an adult male county resident. He may have been infected while hunting in Lake County, noted Sharon Waldern, clinic supervisor for the county’s public health department. “Lake County had two cases of human plague last year.” The man has been hospitalized and is receiving treatment, Waldern noted. “People need to realize he was never considered contagious and he started treatment fairly quickly.” Plague is spread to humans through a bite from an infected flea. The disease is serious but treatable with antibiotics if caught early, officials said. Plague can be passed from fleas feeding on infected rodents and then transmitted to humans. Direct contact with infected tissues or fluids from handling sick or dead animals can pass the disease, as well as through respiratory droplets from cats and humans with pneumonic plague, officials said in a press release. Some types are spread from person to person, but that is not the case here, Waldern said. Symptoms typically develop within one to four days and up to seven days after exposure and include fever, chills, headache, weakness and a bloody or watery cough due to pneumonia, enlarged, tender lymph nodes, abdominal pain and bleeding into the skin or other organs.

Plague is rare in Oregon. Only three human cases have been diagnosed since 1995 and they all recovered. Last year two human cases of plague were diagnosed in Lake County. As far as she knows, this is the first ever incident in Umatilla County. “In this recent case it is important to stay away from flea-infested areas and to recognize the symptoms. People can protect themselves, their family members and their pets,” said Genni Lehnert-Beers, administrator for Umatilla County Health Department. “Using flea treatment on your pets is very important, because your pets can bring fleas into your home.” People should contact their health care provider or veterinarian if plague is suspected. Early treatment for people and pets with appropriate antibiotics is essential to curing plague infections. Untreated plague can be fatal for animals and people. Antibiotics to prevent or treat plague should be used only under the direction of a health care provider. Additional steps to prevent flea bites include wearing insect repellent, tucking pant cuffs into socks when in areas heavily occupied by rodents, and avoiding contact with wildlife including rodents.
Biohazard name: Plague (Bubonic)
Biohazard level: 4/4 Hazardous
Biohazard desc.: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, and for which vaccines or other treatments are not available, such as Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, H5N1(bird flu), Dengue hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, hantaviruses, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic or unidentified diseases. When dealing with biological hazards at this level the use of a Hazmat suit and a self-contained oxygen supply is mandatory. The entrance and exit of a Level Four biolab will contain multiple showers, a vacuum room, an ultraviolet light room, autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. Multiple airlocks are employed and are electronically secured to prevent both doors opening at the same time. All air and water service going to and coming from a Biosafety Level 4 (P4) lab will undergo similar decontamination procedures to eliminate the possibility of an accidental release.
Symptoms:
Statu

The Black Death: Bubonic Plague


 

confirmed

http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/site/?pageid=event_desc&edis_id=EH...

 

 

 

 

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Comment by Starr DiGiacomo 23 hours ago

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-dengue-sri-lanka-idUSKBN1...

JULY 24, 2017 / 1:51 PM / 9 HOURS AGO

Dengue outbreak kills 300 in Sri Lanka, hospitals at limit

COLOMBO (Reuters) - An outbreak of dengue virus has killed around 300 people so far this year in Sri Lanka and hospitals are stretched to capacity, health officials said on Monday.

They blamed recent monsoon rains and floods that have left pools of stagnant water and rotting rain-soaked trash -- ideal breeding sites for mosquitoes that carry the virus.

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies is scaling up emergency assistance to Sri Lanka with the Sri Lanka Red Cross to help contain the outbreak.

"Dengue patients are streaming into overcrowded hospitals that are stretched beyond capacity and struggling to cope, particularly in the country’s hardest hit western province," Red Cross/Red Crescent said in a statement.

According to the World Health Organization, dengue is one of the world's fastest growing diseases, endemic in 100 countries, with as many as 390 million infections annually. Early detection and treatment save lives when infections are severe, particularly for young children.

The Sri Lankan government is struggling to control the virus, which causes flu-like symptoms and can develop into the deadly hemorrhagic dengue fever.

The ministry of health said the number of dengue infections has climbed above 100,000 since the start of 2017, with 296 deaths.

"Ongoing downpours and worsening sanitation conditions raise concerns the disease will continue to spread," Red Cross/Red Crescent said.

Its assistance comes a week after Australia announced programs to help control dengue fever in Sri Lanka.

"Dengue is endemic here, but one reason for the dramatic rise in cases is that the virus currently spreading has evolved and people lack the immunity to fight off the new strain," Novil Wijesekara, head of health at the Sri Lanka Red Cross said in a statement.

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on June 14, 2017 at 5:22pm

http://www.thebigwobble.org/2017/06/a-cholera-epidemic-is-bringing-...

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

A cholera epidemic is bringing war torn Yemen to it's knees as experts predict 250,000 will contract the disease in the coming months

Photo ibtimes.co.uk
At Yemen's Sabaeen Hospital, code black is an understatement: patients sleep three to a bed, on the bare floor or outside in tents as cholera brings a country torn by war to its knees.
Six weeks into the second outbreak of the deadly disease in less than a year, at least one patient checks in at Sabaeen every 60 seconds, leaving staff unable to cope.
"Over the past two weeks, we've been receiving patients at a rate of one or two, sometimes even three, per minute," said Ismail Mansuri, a doctor treating cholera patients at Sabaeen.
The situation is nearly indescribable in Yemen, where a long-running conflict escalated in 2015 as regional powers joined the fight for control over the country, the poorest in the Arab world.
Two years later, less than half of Yemen's medical facilities are functional as the war has killed 8,000 people, displaced millions and seen port blockades push the country to the brink of famine.
Cholera re-appeared on April 27 after an initial outbreak in October 2016, and the United Nations says it is now spreading at an "unprecedented rate".
British charity Oxfam estimates the waterborne disease now kills at least one person per hour in Yemen.
Hospitals have been overwhelmed, with cholera cases putting emergency rooms in constant code black -- when a hospital is unable to cope with the number of patients.
Official figures show more than 920 people have died and 124,000 have been taken ill with cholera since late April, with the rebel-held capital Sanaa hit the hardest.
Few areas remain untouched, with the disease affecting 20 of the country's 22 provinces.
Experts project at least a quarter of a million people will contract cholera in the next six months.
"The hike in contraction is beyond troubling," said Maher al-Hada of Yemen's Center to Fight Cholera.
"We have a good 300 patients come through our doors every day".
Like other medics, Hada struggles to secure access to electricity, clean water and basic medical supplies as Yemen's Saudi-backed government remains locked in a war with Huthi rebels allied with Iran.
Damage to sewage systems, the electricity grid and piping have left Yemen's main water supplies contaminated with the bacteria, and the crisis is only expected to escalate as the rain season approaches.
In the southern province of Aden, where the Yemeni government is based, foul-smelling stagnant water has turned black, attracting mosquitos and insects that experts warn are a potent means of transmitting contagious diseases.
Majid al-Daari, head of the cholera treatment centre at the Al-Sadaqa Hospital in Aden, said his facility has seen more than 200 cases this week alone.
Umm Hisham Munir, the superintendant at a school in Aden, rushed her two sons to hospital when they began to show symptoms of cholera, a bacterial infection which can be deadly if not treated immediately.
"We're terrified that the disease will just keep spreading.
People are poor here.
They can't afford medical care.
They can't afford to move," Munir said in Aden. Ammar Abdelmalek, a resident in the rebel-held central Ibb province, said the streets were "flooded" with garbage and sewage.
"This is why we have cholera," said Abdelmalek.
In the northern province of Lahj, Mazen al-Sayed said the privilege of having a car saved his mother's life.
"Honestly it's because I have a car that my mother is still alive.
Others die on the spot," said Sayed.
The message from aid agencies is unequivocal: more aid is needed to stem the disease from turning into an all-out epidemic.
The World Health Organization and International Committee of the Red Cross are two of the groups leading the fight against cholera, but even they face an uphill battle.
"WHO is working to access remoted areas heavily affected to reach as many patients as possible," said Omar Saleh, a member of the WHO mission to Yemen.
"The humanitarian situation is alarming," Saleh said.
"We are looking at a real disaster.
The disease has nothing to do with political affiliations".

Comment by Derrick Johnson on June 8, 2017 at 7:28am

The American bug ravaging Italy's olive oil industry: Bacteria causes trees to wither and die - and there's no cure

  • The pathogen causes olive tree leaves to wither and dry, causing the tree to die 
  • It was first spotted in Europe in 2013 and likely came from the Americas  
  • There's no cure and it requires the uprooting of infected trees to prevent spread
  • But protestors in southern Italy want to stop the felling of the ancient trees, 
  • They've chained themselves to trees and have even opened a criminal investigation into whether researchers caused the infection themselves 
  • There are several subpsecies of the pathogen throughout Europe and the European Commission is trying to monitor its spread  

A bacterial pathogen is destroying olive trees in southern Italy, and local Italian authorities are doing little to contain the disease.

The pathogen - for which there is no cure - most likely arrived from the Americas and requires the uprooting of infected trees to prevent it from spreading. 

But protestors and a local public prosecutor in the southern Italian town of Puglia are trying to block the felling of ancient olive trees, and have even opened a criminal investigation into whether researchers caused the infection themselves.

Olive trees infected by the bacteria 'Xylella fastidiosa' in Gallipoli in the Puglia region of Italy. The pathogen causes Olive Quick Decline Syndrome (OQDS), a disease which causes withering and desiccation (extreme dryness) of terminal shoots, which then expand to the rest of the canopy, causing the tree to collapse and die

Olive trees infected by the bacteria 'Xylella fastidiosa' in Gallipoli in the Puglia region of Italy. The pathogen causes Olive Quick Decline Syndrome (OQDS), a disease which causes withering and desiccation (extreme dryness) of terminal shoots, which then expand to the rest of the canopy, causing the tree to collapse and die

According to Nature News, last year Italian authorities failed to track the olive tree infection, caused by a bacterium called Xylella fastidiosa. 

It hadn't been seen in Europe until 2013, when it was found in Puglia, Italy. 

Researchers found that the pathogen causes Olive Quick Decline Syndrome (OQDS), a disease which causes withering and desiccation (extreme dryness) of terminal shoots, which then expand to the rest of the canopy, causing the tree to collapse and die.

Italian authorities didn't follow the disease containment plan agreed to with the European Commission, and an audit published by the Commission includes the failures of the local governments, who began monitoring the infection too late and delayed removing infected trees.

Two years ago in the town of Oria in southern Italy, task forces in charge of uprooting infected olive trees encountered difficulties when protestors chained themselves to ancient trees

Two years ago in the town of Oria in southern Italy, task forces in charge of uprooting infected olive trees encountered difficulties when protestors chained themselves to ancient trees

In most of 2016, laboratories in Italy analyzed almost no Xylella samples. 

The European Commission is concerned that the pathogen X.fastidiosa pauca - the subspecies that causes OQDS - will spread throughout Europe, threatening its olive industry as whole. 

Monitoring programmes coordinated by the Commission have identified other subspecies of Xylella in other EU countries, and in May, a devastating subspecies of the pathogen, X.fastidiosa fastidiosa, which causes Pierce's disease and regularly wipes out vineyards in California, was found in Mallorca, Spain. 

While the spread of the infection was contained there, researchers worry that other undiscovered subspecies could infect other crops. 

Two years ago in the town of Oria in southern Italy, task forces in charge of uprooting infected olive trees encountered difficulties when protestors chained themselves to ancient trees. 

Map of Xyllella fastidiosa bacteria worldwide. Countries in orange show where the bacterium is present, and countries in purple where the bacterium is transient. It shows the spread of the bacterium species, but not specific subspecies

Map of Xyllella fastidiosa bacteria worldwide. Countries in orange show where the bacterium is present, and countries in purple where the bacterium is transient. It shows the spread of the bacterium species, but not specific subspecies

The challenges in Oria began in 2015 when military-police general Giuseppe Silletti began containment measures which included cutting down healthy trees around infected ones. 

Following EU regulations, he drew a map of infected areas, including a 20-kilometers 'buffer zone' around the area where trees were mostly healthy, but needed to be monitored. 

A scanning electron micrograph of Xylella fastidiosa bacteria in the xylem vessel of an infected sweet orange leaf. The bacteria block these vessels, impairing water uptake in plants, causing withering and desiccation (extreme dryness) of leaves

A scanning electron micrograph of Xylella fastidiosa bacteria in the xylem vessel of an infected sweet orange leaf. The bacteria block these vessels, impairing water uptake in plants, causing withering and desiccation (extreme dryness) of leaves

However, protestors and Puglia's publig prosecutor hampered his team's efforts by suspending the felling of trees, and Silletti resigned in December of 2015 because his plans were being blocked.  

The prosecutor finally lifted the felling ban when the European Commission threatened to report the Italian government to the European Court of Justice. 

While Puglia's regional governor has since appointed a new task force to tackle the problem, its goals and composition haven't been made public. 

The disease causes withering and desiccation (extreme dryness) of terminal shoots, which then expand to the rest of canopy, causing the tree to collapse and die. Pictured is a dried branch of olive tree, partly infected by Xyella fastidiosa, in Caprarica in Italy's Puglia region

The disease causes withering and desiccation (extreme dryness) of terminal shoots, which then expand to the rest of canopy, causing the tree to collapse and die. Pictured is a dried branch of olive tree, partly infected by Xyella fastidiosa, in Caprarica in Italy's Puglia region

Some protestors don't believe that the pathogen is causing the infection, and some sent a new complaint to the prosecutor in May saying that researchers ignored other potential causes of infection such as a fungus, even though this has already been ruled out by the European Commission.

Despite these setbacks, researchers in Puglia have identified two types of olive tree that are mostly resistant to the disease, and the Commission suggested that they could be planted in infected areas to replace dead trees. 

However, developing full resistant trees could take time - a decade or more.  

The Xylella fastidiosa pathogen - for which there is no cure - most likely arrived from the Americas and requires the uprooting of infected trees to prevent it from spreading

The Xylella fastidiosa pathogen - for which there is no cure - most likely arrived from the Americas and requires the uprooting of infected trees to prevent it from spreading

Different subspecies of the pathogen have been seen in countries across the EU, and more may be found. 

Genes flow 'relatively easily' between the different species, says Dr Rodrigo Almeida, who studies Xylella at the University of California, Berkeley.

This gene flow could result in even more pathogenic version of the infection. 

Some protestors don't believe that the pathogen is causing the infection, and some sent a new complaint to a Puglia prosecutor in May saying that researchers ignored other potential causes of infection such as a fungus, even though this has already been ruled out by the European Commission

Some protestors don't believe that the pathogen is causing the infection, and some sent a new complaint to a Puglia prosecutor in May saying that researchers ignored other potential causes of infection such as a fungus, even though this has already been ruled out by the European Commission

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4581856/Italy-s-oliv...

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on March 7, 2017 at 7:58pm

Dead within 3 hours

https://www.naij.com/1092310-4-villagers-die-strange-disease-zamfar...

4 villagers die of strange disease in Zamfara, many hospitalised

Comment by Willa Rawlings on February 1, 2017 at 7:05pm

RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service has added a new section, to monitor Avian Flu.

Scroll down past the 'Long time events' section:

http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on October 30, 2016 at 9:29pm

http://www.skyvalleychronicle.com/BREAKING-NEWS/Multi-agency-probe-...

Multi agency probe underway into mysterious illness affecting eight children in Washington state
October 29, 2016

(SEATTLE, WA.) -- The Washington State Department of Health is leading a joint investigation into reports of eight children who were admitted to Seattle Children’s Hospital with acute neurologic illnesses which have yet to be identified.

As part of the agency's work to understand their symptoms, it is investigating the possibility of a condition known as acute flaccid myelitis (AFM). 

AFM is a rare condition that can be caused by many different things; it affects the nervous system, specifically the spinal cord. Symptoms typically include sudden weakness in one or more arms or legs, along with loss of muscle tone and decreased or absent reflexes. 

Public Health Seattle & King County, Seattle Children’s Hospital, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are working with the Department of Health on the investigation. At this time, there are no confirmed cases of AFM. 

The exact cause of AFM is unknown. Many viruses and germs are linked to AFM, including common germs that can cause colds and sore throats, and respiratory infections. 

It can also be caused by poliovirus and non-polio enteroviruses, mosquito-borne viruses (such as West Nile Virus or Zika virus) and autoimmune conditions. 

The eight children were admitted to the hospital with a range of types and severity of symptoms, but all had a loss of strength or movement in one or more arms or legs. 

The children are from four counties [King County - 3 children, Pierce County - 1 child, Franklin County- 2 children, and Whatcom County - 2 children] and range in age from 3 to 14 years old.

Three of the eight cases are currently hospitalized at Seattle Children’s Hospital and five have been released. 

"At Seattle Children’s, patient safety is our top priority and parents should rest assured that it is safe to bring their children to the hospital," said Dr. Mark Del Beccaro, chief medical officer at Seattle Children’s Hospital. "We are following our standard infection control protocols, including putting patients with symptoms of active respiratory infections in isolation so they do not have contact with any other patients."

Public Health Seattle & King County, the DOH and the CDC are in the process of further evaluating each case and conducting tests to determine if the patients meet the case definition for AFM, and if an underlying cause can be identified.

However, the cause of any individual case of AFM can be hard to determine, and often, no cause is found, said a statement from the health department.

The CDC makes the final determination regarding whether these are confirmed cases of AFM or not.

"At this point there isn’t evidence that would point to a single source of illness among these cases," said Dr. Scott Lindquist, state infectious disease epidemiologist at the Department of Health. "However, this investigation is just getting underway and we’re looking at all possibilities as we try to understand what might have contributed to these illnesses."

There were no cases of AFM reported in Washington State last year, but there were two cases in 2014. There have been more than 50 cases of AFM in 24 states across the U.S. so far this year. 

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on August 28, 2016 at 9:23pm

http://www.thenational.ae/world/unpredictable-weather-raises-zombie...

Unpredictable weather raises ‘zombie’ diseases from the ground
The Scottish island of Gruinard had been quarantined for decades after field trials of anthrax as biological weapon in 1942. AP Photo

Unpredictable weather raises ‘zombie’ diseases from the ground

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on August 20, 2016 at 1:16am
Mysterious 'zombiedisease cluster hits Australia
A FLESH-eating zombie bug is spreading in Australia, gnawing at skin and causing amputations in extreme cases.

Bairnsdale Ulcer could spread to other Australian states

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 29, 2016 at 10:47pm

http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/n0691-40-now-hospitalise...

40 now hospitalised after anthrax outbreak in Yamal, more than half...

By The Siberian Times reporter
30 July 2016

Russian army biological protection troops called in amid warnings 'utmost care' needed to stop deadly infection spreading.

A total of 40 people are under observation in hospital. Picture: Vesti Yamal

The concern among experts is that global warming thawed a diseased animal carcass at least 75 years old, buried in the melting permafrost, so unleashing the disease. 

A total of 40 people, the majority of them children, from nomadic herder families in northern Siberia are under observation in hospital amid fears they may have contracted the anthrax. Doctors stress that so far there are NO confirmed cases. 

Up to 1,200 reindeer were killed either by anthrax or a heatwave in the Arctic district where the infection spread.

Specialists from the Chemical, Radioactive and Biological Protection Corps were rushed to regional capital Salekhard on a military Il-76 aircraft. 

They were deployed by Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu to carry laboratory tests on the ground, detect and eliminate the focal point of the infection, and to dispose safely of dead animals.

40 now hospitalised after anthrax outbreak in Yamal, more than half are children

The move confirmed the seriousness with which the authorities view the anthrax outbreak, the first in this region since 1941. 

The army unit is equipped with military helicopters as well as off road vehicles for what Yamalo-Nenets governor Dmitry Kobylkin calls 'an extremely challenging task of liquidating the consequences - and disinfecting the focus - of the infection. I think this perhaps will be the first in the world operation cleaning up a territory of mass deer mortality over such distances in the tundra.'

Eight new people were admitted to hospital in Salekhard early on Friday, bringing the total to 40, said officials. 

Earlier it was reported that 13 were in hospital. 

'As of now, there is no single diagnosis of the dangerous infection,' said a spokesman for the governor of Yamalo-Nenets, Dmitry Kobylkin. 'Medics are taking preliminary measures even if there is the slightest doubt over the nomads' state of health.'

The 40 are all from a total of 63 nomads belonging to a dozen families who were at the site of the outbreak at Tarko-Sale Faktoria camp. The remaining nomads have been evacuated some 60 kilometres from the focus of infection in Yamalsky district.

A prolonged period of exceptionally hot weather in an Arctic Siberian district - with temperatures of up to 35C - has led to melting of permafrost in Yamalo-Nenets and other regions. 

The outbreak of anthrax earlier this week is the first in this part of Russia since 1941.

Officials say 1,200 reindeer have died in recent days, evidently through a combination of infection from anthrax, and the heatwave - unprecedented in living memory.

A major inoculation programme is also underway with a local state of emergency declared at Tarko-Sale Faktoria camp, above the Arctic Circle and close to the Yaro To lake, some 340 kilometres north-east of Salekhard.

It is already clear that the anthrax outbreak has come despite major precautions against the disease in a part of northern Russia which takes huge pride in its venison industry, with supplies sent to other regions of the country and abroad. 

Officials insisted that last year almost half a million reindeer were vaccinated against anthrax. 

One leading academic Professor Florian Stammler, of the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, Finland, has warned of the serious risk of anthrax spreading around the Yamal Peninsula from this location, which he portrays as a reindeer junction.

He told The Siberian Times: 'I have myself moved together with private herders around the Yaro To lake. 

'The location is an important pass way for many reindeer nomads, used in all seasons. The nomads with the furthest longest migration routes use it in early May, just before calving time, moving up North in spring towards their summer pastures. 

Continues.............

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 10, 2016 at 6:59am

http://outbreaknewstoday.com/venezuela-malaria-case-count-tops-1000...

Venezuela malaria case count tops 100,000, up 68 percent from 2015

July 9, 2016

Venezuela recorded the most malaria cases in decades in 2015 (HERE), ending the year with a total 136,402 cases. However, the data for the first 25 weeks of 2016 put the country over the 100,000 case threshold, a whopping 68 percent increase compared to the same period in the record year of 2015, according to the Bulletin of Environmental Health as reported in an....

Image/Alvaro1984 18

Image/Alvaro1984 18

More than 4500 locally acquired cases were reported in epidemiological week 25 alone. The case tally so far this year eclipses the total for all of 2014.

Three of of four cases are due to Plasmodium vivax, while 16 percent are due to the more serious Plasmodium falciparum.

Eighty percent of cases were reported from Bolivar state in eastern Venezuela on the borders of Brazil and Guyana.

Malaria is considered the most important parasitic disease affecting humans. The femaleAnopheles mosquito serves as the vector for the parasite.

The mosquito-borne disease continues to sicken and kill far too many people eachyear, most of them children. In 2012, roughly 207 million cases of malaria occurred worldwide resulting in 627,000 deaths, according to the World HealthOrganization (WHO). In 2013, 97countries had ongoing malaria transmission, placing 3.4 billion people at risk for the disease.

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