Determine Your Safe Locations - 7 Steps

 

As presented by the Zetas during the September 11, 2010 chat.


Step 1

is to research your location in the Safe Locations information (http://www.zetatalk.com/info/tinfo242.htm) on the ZetaTalk website. In this you should examine not only your country, your state or province, or your city but also any nearby. Your specific town may not be covered but the whole river valley may be predicted to flood and to flood permanently. This would be a clue that your specific town will be likewise affected. We cannot and have not addressed every spot on Earth, due to time and energy constraints, as we expect you to have a brain and take this approach.

Step 2
is to research your location from the standpoint of the climate that will exist after the pole shift. This is quickly ascertained by looking at the New Geology map. This is a free map which can be cut out and taped together and will give a general idea of the latitude to expect. If your chosen location is where one of the new poles will be, this is a clue that you need to rethink or plan a migration route. This is likewise the case if your chosen location will be on land that will sink below the waves entirely, such as India or western Australia.

Large Scale version: Click Me

Step 3
is to research your elevation above sea level. A handy and free tool is Google Earth (http://www.google.com/earth/index.html) which can be downloaded into a PC and will show the exact elevation of any spot the cursor passes over. HeyWhatsThat is a website that provides you with a color coded map based on a changing elevation. Our advice to be 100 miles from a coastline and 200 feet above sea level to avoid the coastal tidal waves during the pole shift should be applied. You can determine your current elevation and whether your location will be 675 feet above sea level where the water will rise within 2 years after the pole shift. A rough guide in this matter is the map Nancy created.


Step 4
is to determine the effect if you are in one of those regions which will rise or fall. India and western Australia will be below the waves as of the time of the pole shift, and being pushed down before the pole shift. Japan gains 150 feet, New Zealand gains 500 feet and eastern Australia benefits also, Spain loses 50 feet, western UK loses 150 feet, New England gains 450 feet due to the Seaway rip, Florida loses 150 feet, and Vancouver Island gains 100 feet.



Step 5
is to research the effect of swollen rivers which will likely be in a backwash during the pole shift. We have stated that ALL rivers will be over their banks, so the worst possible scenario should be assumed. What will happen if the river cannot drain? Despite having a good sea level elevation, any land that does not have an advantage of being at least 200 feet in elevation over a major river bottom in the vicinity is likely to be flooded. A backwash from the main river in your vicinity should be assumed, so that creeks will not drain, for instance. Water on the move (http://www.zetatalk.com/poleshft/p103.htm) tears and bites and scours, and will undercut the soil under buildings so they will tilt and tumble. Being on solid rock that will not melt in this scenario is advised. Tidal bore along cliffs facing the ocean can likewise have water climbing up, or funneled up by ravines which will direct water all the way to Guadalajara from the Pacific, for example. Think this through, for your location, and be on the safe side.

Step 6
is to examine your volcanic or geographic risk due to mountain building. We have advised a 100 mile radius from all volcanoes that have been active within the last 10,000 years, and that Yellowstone will not become a super volcano. You can determine if the new westerly winds will blow volcanic ash in your direction. Consider that what was formerly north will now be west or east. Fire storms, though extremely rare, almost always occur near erupting volcanoes during the hour of the pole shift. We have advised that if in areas subject to mountain building that old rock not shattered is a good guide to what will survive, and newly fractured rock is a clue that more of the same might be expected. Older mountains as the Alps and Appalachians are considered safe, where the Sierras and Andes are building.



Step 7
is to ascertain if you need a migration route. It is possible to survive the pole shift by avoiding tidal waves and staying outside of structures that will crush you, but to be in a position to be flooded within 2 years after the pole shift. Siberia is a case in point. Here the land is so low in elevation that vast swaths of land will be flooded, and survivors must plan to migrate on foot or via boat. Survivors near the new N Pole off the Bulge of Brazil might consider migrating toward the Andes and their familiar tropical warmth. Such migration, and your target location, can be plotted. Migration routes can be expected to be crowded, so should be avoided as a location for survival camps in general.

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