On Monday, May 11th, we had a surge of power through our house so great, that it magnified the brightness of our lightbulbs tenfold.  The lights and one of the circuits proceeded to burn out, and the surge fried anything that was plugged in—as a strong burst of magnetic energy would. Even a surge strip did not keep the cable box from being fried. This type of situation has never occurred in our home in over 50 years. The event occurred at a little after 13:00 pm CST, or 18:00 UTC. No source was found for the surge, only a fried wire, which had caused a burning smell in the home. Certainly a malfunctioning wire, more than like fried by the surge as well, would not cause a surge in power, but a reduction in it. Would the Zetas care to comment on whether we are now experiencing  EMPs from PX on a more frequent basis? If so, would it be recommended that all electronics not in use be disconnected from their power source? Space was relatively quiet, but the magnetosphere was fluctuating widely. [and from another] http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news... The cut was said to have been caused by an electrical surge. People in the area say "Smoke was coming from the electric cupboard from 86 Deansgate when the power surge hit. 4 fire engines responded to the call". Jade Barrow is a receptionist at 86 Deansgate, and said the whole building shook. She said: "The firemen explained to me that an electrical surge is like 2 magnets hitting each other. That's why it all shook because of the force."  [and from another]http://poleshift.ning.com/profiles/blog/show?id=3863141%3ABlogPost%... May 15. After 15 days with approximately 300 hours of missing data, it appears the uninterrupted BATSRUS RCM image feed has resumed.


Air France 447 in 2009 and Malaysia 370 and the recent Germanwings A320 are in the news because they impact the airline industry, and the blame thus placed elsewhere. To date, pilot suicide, storms, and bad pilot judgement have been used, and how is the public to know otherwise? Electric trains such as the Disney Monorail  and DC Metro crash incidents in 2009 and the recent Amtrak 188 go into investigation while talking heads murmur about safety devices or track maintenance or mechanical failure, which ultimately get the blame.  

It is only when the public is broadly affected that the public can get a hint that something else is afoot. Cell phones are regularly having disrupted service but the blame is placed on blocked access to towers or bad weather. The blackberry outage in 2008 was blamed on a software glitch. If the public is frankly being lied to, engineers responsible for maintaining equipment and the grid are not fooled. The talk has spilled over into the press, or into conversations with the public. During the Washington DC blackout, the electrical problem was described at first by the Washington Post as a “surge”. 

This is a key determinant between a failed electrical system, a simple outage, and electro-magnetic pulse. Pulse is a surge, and the sudden increase in the amount of magnetons and their associated electrons, such that equipment controlled by a steady pace of either particle flow goes into a runaway state. When equipment is guarded by surge protection, to guard against lightning strikes, it will shut down, as a brownout situation can damage equipment. But unless a lightning strike was present, there can be no excuse for a pulse or surge other than the presence of the charged tail of Planet X, aka Nibiru.  

What can the public expect? As cell phone service and cable TV via satellite continues to degrade, as airplanes increasingly crash during complete electronics failure or are forced to land with smoke in their cockpits, as electric trains surge off the tracks and brakes fail, as transformers explode at dams and on the grid, and as residential lights flicker and erratic and unexplained and spotty blackouts descend, the public can expect endless inane excuses from the establishment. The truth will be withheld because mankind is so dependent upon his electrical systems and equipment that the thought of being without is unthinkable. It is mass denial. 

Source: ZetaTalk Chat Q&A for May 23, 2015

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Comment by M. Difato on Friday

Emergency Declared For SkyWest Flight Landing At Aspen-Pitkin County Airport After Possible Smoke Reported In Cabin

https://news.yahoo.com/emergency-declared-skywest-flight-landing-22...

An emergency was called for SkyWest flight 3150 as it approached the Aspen-Pitkin County Airport on Wednesday morning (February 25, 2021) Electric fumes stated in bews video.

~

https://flightaware.com/live/flight/SKW3150/history/20210224/1502Z/...

Aircraft Type: Canadair Regional Jet CRJ-700 (twin-jet) (CRJ7)
Comment by Juan F Martinez on February 21, 2021 at 4:37pm

Two people injured in Netherlands as ANOTHER Boeing jet rains down debris due to engine fire (PHOTO)
Dutch authorities are investigating after a Boeing cargo plane began shedding metal parts shortly after takeoff. The incident coincided with a similar debris-dump by a Boeing aircraft flying near Denver, Colorado.

One of the Boeing 747-400’s engines reportedly caught fire after the plane departed from Maastricht-Aachen airport on Saturday. According to airport officials, the plane then began to “lose” debris as it flew over a residential area near the airport.

https://www.rt.com/news/516212-boeing-engine-problems-maastricht/

https://t.me/ZetaTalk_Followers/459

Comment by M. Difato on February 21, 2021 at 1:59am

United Airlines flight safely lands after dramatic engine failure caught on camera

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/united-airlines-flight-sa...



A United Airlines flight experienced a dramatic-looking engine failure just after takeoff from Denver International Airport on Saturday afternoon (Feb 20). UA328, originally headed to Honolulu, quickly circled back to the airport and made a safe landing after the pilots calmly made a “mayday” call to air traffic control. There were no injuries among the 231 passengers and 10 airline staff on board, according to the FAA.
a large passenger jet flying through a clear blue sky© Image: Hayden Smith / speedbird5280 (Instagram)

Since it’s 2021, the incident was thoroughly captured with both photos and video. Passengers shared video of what looks to be a significant right engine failure, with visible damage, flames, and trailing smoke:

Photographer Hayden Smith snapped a series of images of the Boeing 777-200 plane that offer a closer look at the damaged engine from the ground and posted them to Dropbox not long after the plane safely landed.

a large passenger jet flying through a clear blue sky© Image: Hayden Smith / speedbird5280 (Instagram)

But even before that, a dash cam managed to get the moment that the engine seemingly blew out.

Comment by M. Difato on February 20, 2021 at 7:20pm

United Airlines flight forced to make emergency landing in New Orleans after ‘mechanical issue’

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/united-airlines-flight-forced-to-...

NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) -Untied Airline flight 1832 was forced to land at Louis Armstrong International Airport Saturday morning (Feb 20) after some sort of mechanical problem, according to a spokesperson for the airport.

The flight departed Cancun, Mexico at 8:45 a.m.

Details regarding what type of mechanical issue was not immediately known.

The plane landed safely at 10:19 a.m.

No injuries were reported.

~

Aircraft Type - Boeing 737-800 (twin-jet)

Comment by M. Difato on February 14, 2021 at 4:30pm

Mid-air drama as giant RAF plane makes emergency landing at Birmingham Airport

A hulking RAF cargo plane passed low over rooftops as it made an unscheduled landing following a mid-air emergency. The imposing Globemaster III (C-17) made the dramatic approach after diverting to Birmingham Airport this morning. The cargo plane, which measures 174ft long, had been on a routine mission when it suffered a ‘technical issue’, the RAF said. The crew had issued a distress signal and reported smoke in the cockpit around 20 minutes after taking off from RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire.

Unconfirmed reports on social media, based on open source data, suggested that fire engines had been scrambled at the airport. Aviation enthusiast James Harrison tracked the giant transport aircraft through data showing it had headed north towards Telford in Shropshire before bearing east into Birmingham. As it approached at around 11.30am, it was at an altitude of 2,000ft.

 

The RAF C-17 Globemaster was photographed as it passed over rooftops on its diversion to Birmingham Airport (Picture: Yvonne Lewis)

 

Aviation enthusiast James Harrison captured the emergency diversion on a flight tracking website (Picture: Flightradar24)

James, who has photographed the plane on a previous occasion, said: ‘The C17 was squawking 7700 which is the emergency code and apparently there was smoke and fumes in the cockpit.’.."

Sources:

 https://metro.co.uk/2021/02/12/drama-as-giant-raf-plane-makes-emerg...

 https://www.newsoneplace.com/6857692012/raf-emergency-landing-airpo...

Comment by M. Difato on February 2, 2021 at 10:57pm

SpiceJet Flight Makes Emergency Landing After Pilot Reports Cabin Fire on Kolkata to Bagdogra Flight

A Kolkata to Bagdogra SpiceJet Flight SG 275 has landed safely after pilot informed cabin fire to ATC. The flight was airborne after taking off from the West Bengal's capital at 4.33 pm (Feb 1) and made an emergency landing four minutes into the flight with all the precautions at 4.37 pm.

Total 69 passengers, including cabin crew were on board. West Bengal's DG Virendra, Security Adviser Surajit Kar Purkayastha were also inside the aircraft, along with other passengers.

All the passengers are reported safe and Engineers are checking the aircraft.

Further details are awaited.

~

Aircraft Type :737

https://flightaware.com/live/flight/SEJ275/history/20210201/0945Z/V...

Comment by M. Difato on November 24, 2020 at 7:22pm

Alaska Airlines Flight Makes Emergency Landing At Sacramento International Airport

https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2020/11/23/alaska-airlines-flight...

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – Following reports of smoke in the cockpit, a plane made an emergency landing at Sacramento International Airport on Monday (Nov 23), the airport said.

SMF said an Alaska Airlines flight from Las Vegas to Seattle was diverted to the area and made a safe landing allowing for passengers to get off.

After being inspected, the plane was cleared to fly and was prepared for takeoff to resume the flight, officials said.

No injuries were reported in the incident.

https://flightaware.com/live/flight/ASA1433/history/20201123/2305Z/...

Aircraft Type - Boeing 737-700 (twin-jet)
Comment by M. Difato on November 20, 2020 at 2:53pm

Austin flight bound for Seattle turns around, makes emergency landing after smoke in cabin

https://www.kxan.com/news/local/austin/austin-flight-bound-for-seat...

AUSTIN (KXAN) — A Delta Airlines flight from Austin Bergstrom International Airport to Seattle had to turn around shortly after takeoff and make an emergency landing Thursday morning (Nov 19), airport officials said.

There was light smoke reported in the cabin. The plane turned around and landed safely though back in Austin.

Delta Flight 1062 was scheduled for takeoff from AUS at 6 a.m. and due for landing at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport at 8:34 a.m. Pacific Time, but it had to come back to AUS shortly after it got in the air.

The plane landed safely at 7:03 a.m.

You can view the plane’s flight plan on FlightAware.com

https://flightaware.com/live/flight/DAL1062/history/20201119/1210Z/...

Aircraft Type - Airbus A319 (twin-jet) 
Comment by M. Difato on November 18, 2020 at 5:48pm

Boeing 737 Max being cleared for flight worldwide, with no responsible open talks of EMP vulnerability responsible for these deadly crashes.

FAA approves Boeing 737 Max to fly again, a milestone for Chicago-based Boeing

https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-boeing-737-max-faa-a...

After nearly two years and a pair of deadly crashes, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has cleared Boeing’s 737 Max for flight.

The nation’s air safety agency announced the move early Wednesday, saying it was done after a “comprehensive and methodical” 20-month review process.

Regulators around the world grounded the Max in March 2019, after the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines jet. That happened less than five months after another Max flown by Indonesia’s Lion Air plunged into the Java Sea. A total of 346 passengers and crew members on both planes were killed.

The planes won’t return to the skies for a while. The FAA says it must approve pilot training changes for each U.S. airline and airlines must perform required maintenance on the planes.

The FAA says the move was made in cooperation with air safety regulators worldwide. “Those regulators have indicated that Boeing’s design changes, together with the changes to crew procedures and training enhancements, will give them the confidence to validate the aircraft as safe to fly in their respective countries and regions,” the FAA said in a statement.

The move came after numerous congressional hearings on the crashes that led to criticism of the FAA for lax oversight and Chicago-based Boeing for rushing to implement a new software system that put profits over safety and ultimately led to the firing of its CEO.

Investigators focused on anti-stall software that Boeing had devised to counter the plane’s tendency to tilt nose-up because of the size and placement of the engines. That software pushed the nose down repeatedly on both planes that crashed, overcoming the pilots' struggles to regain control. In each case, a single faulty sensor triggered the nose-down pitch.

The FAA required Boeing to change the software so it doesn’t repeatedly point the nose of the plane down to counteract possible aerodynamic stalling. Boeing says the software also does not override the pilot’s controls like it did in the past. Boeing also must install new display systems for pilots and change the way wires are routed to a tail stabilizer bar.

Boeing’s redemption comes in the middle of a pandemic that has scared away passengers and decimated the aviation industry, limiting the company’s ability to make a comeback. Air travel in the U.S. alone is down about 65% from a year ago.

Boeing sales of new planes have plunged because of the Max crisis and the coronavirus pandemic. Orders for more than 1,000 Max jets have been canceled or removed from Boeing’s backlog this year. Each plane carries a sticker price between $99 million and $135 million, although airlines routinely pay far less than list price.

John Hansman, an aeronautics professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said that people typically avoid airplanes for a few months after there are problems. But the Max case is unusual, and were it not for the novel coronavirus, Hansman said he would feel safe flying on a Max.

“This whole thing has had more scrutiny than any airplane in the world,” he said. “It’s probably the safest airplane to be on.”

American is the only U.S. airline to put the Max back in its schedule so far, starting with one round trip daily between New York and Miami beginning Dec. 29.

Nearly 400 Max jets were in service worldwide when they were grounded, and Boeing has built and stored about 450 more since then. All have to undergo maintenance and get some modifications before they can fly.

Pilots must also undergo simulator training, which was not required when the aircraft was introduced. Hansman said pilot training for qualified 737 pilots shouldn’t take long because Boeing has fixed problems with the Max’s software. The company posted a summary of changes to the plane.

Relatives of people who died in the crashes remain unconvinced of the Max’s safety. They accused Boeing of hiding critical design features from the FAA and say the company tried to fix the tendency for the plane’s nose to tip up with software that was implicated in both crashes.

“The flying public should avoid the Max,” said Michael Stumo, whose 24-year-old daughter died in the second crash. “Change your flight. This is still a more dangerous aircraft than other modern planes.”

Boeing’s reputation has taken a beating since the crashes. Its then-CEO, Dennis Muilenburg, initially suggested that the foreign pilots were to blame. However, congressional investigators discovered an FAA analysis — conducted after the first Max crash — that predicted there would be 15 more crashes during the plane’s life span if the flight-control software were not fixed.

After an 18-month investigation, the House Transportation Committee heaped blame on Boeing, which was under pressure to develop the Max to compete with a plane from European rival Airbus, and the FAA, which certified the Max and was the last agency in the world to ground it after the crashes. The investigators said Boeing suffered from a “culture of concealment,” and pressured engineers in a rush to get the plane on the market.

Boeing was repeatedly wrong about how quickly it could fix the plane. When those predictions continued to be wrong, and Boeing was perceived as putting undue pressure on the FAA, Muilenburg was fired in December 2019.

Dickson — who flew F-15 fighters in the Air Force before serving as a pilot and an executive at Delta Air Lines — flew the plane personally before it was cleared.

In recent weeks, European regulators also signaled their likely approval of Boeing’s work. Regulators in Canada and China are still conducting their own reviews. Relatives say it’s too soon, and they and their lawyers say Boeing and the FAA are withholding documents.

Naoise Ryan, an Irish citizen whose husband died in the Ethiopian crash, said the Max is “the same airplane that crashed not once but twice because safety was not a priority for this company.”

Anton Sahadi, who lives in Jakarta, Indonesia, and lost two brothers in the Lion Air crash, said he feels it is too early for the Max to fly again.

“I, personally, feel so regretful for the decision to unground the Boeing’s 737 Max,” he said. “The cases from the incidents are not 100% finished yet. There are many of them still in process. I think all the victims' family in Indonesia and Ethiopia will feel the same, so regretful, why it can fly again because we are still in the recovery process for our problems because of the incidents.”

~

Related 

ZetaTalk Insight 3/31/2019:
http://www.zetatalk.com/ning/31mr2019.htm
The Boeing 737 Max 8 has been flying for several years, considered a reliable workhorse worldwide. What has happened that only recently two crashes occurred, both involving the nose of the plane stubbornly pointing down? The charged tail of Nibiru has descended, causing not only the Lomonosov explosions
http://www.zetatalk.com/newsletr/issue648.htm
but also neon clouds
http://www.zetatalk.com/newsletr/issue641.htm
so low they blow transformers, as occurred in New York City. Static electricity is evident, per a Mr MBB333 video,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pZWBQLanp4
and this all certainly translates to more electro-magnetic pulse affecting mankind’s electronics.

President Trump, who is aware of Nibiru and the EMP problems, is spot on when he says the solution is to allow the pilots to control the plane – manually. When the sensors are affected by EMP, they mis-direct the autopilot, but gaining manual control of the plane has become a wrestling match. The airline industry is loath to admit their problems with EMP, blaming crashes on pilot error, but gradually the public will become reluctant to fly, as they should. Phone or Skype your loved ones, instead. There are also EMP problems with smart cars that will increasingly go rogue.

ZetaTalk Newsletter as of March 24, 2019

https://poleshift.ning.com/profiles/blogs/zetatalk-newsletter-as-of...

Comment by M. Difato on October 26, 2020 at 4:31pm

A DHL cargo plane made an emergency landing at Heathrow Airport on Saturday evening (Oct 24) after the pilot reported smoke in the cockpit.

https://www.airlive.net/incident-dhl-cargo-plane-performed-an-emerg...

The Airbus A300 touched down safely after 11pm with emergency vehicles on standby it then taxied to the terminal. Airport firefighters were supported by fire crews from London Fire brigade The incident was declared as a full emergency response.

Heathrow fire crews investigated the issue but were unable to determine the cause.

~

London Heathrow emergency landing: Emergency services surround British Airways flight

A BRITISH AIRWAYS flight was forced to abort its journey to Verona and return to London Heathrow Airport, sparking an emergency services response.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1350354/london-heathrow-british-a...

One passenger shared a video of fire engines greeting the plane's arrival in Heathrow yesterday (October 21, 2020), adding: "That was a long 10-minute emergency landing." Passengers safely disembarked and were placed onto a new plane, which took them to Verona. 

In a message posted on Twitter to a passenger, British Airways said: "We apologise for the delay to your flight today.

"We had to return back to London Heathrow due to a technical issue." 

"Safety is our number one priority and we would never continue a flight unless it was safe to do so.

"We are currently in the process of arranging a new aircraft so that we are able to get you to your destination."

 British Airways flight 2596 returned to London Heathrow this morning

 (Image: TWITTER / SHELBOURNEFILMS)

BA said changed its departure time to 12:20 pm local time.

They continued: "Please make your way to Gate C55 where your flight will be boarding from."

BA says there was a technical issue forcing the flight to be diverted back to the UK.

A BA spokesman said: "The safety of our customers and crew is always our priority and the flight returned to Heathrow as a precaution due to a minor technical issue. 

"We've apologised to our customers and have organised a replacement aircraft so that we can get them on their way again as quickly as possible.”

A spokesperson from Heathrow Airport said the plane landed safely and all passengers were disembarked. 

A passenger onboard the flight claimed there was a smell of burning and that a crew member fell ill.

FlightRadar data shows the flight taking off from Heathrow and travelling over South London shortly after 7am yesterday morning. 

 The flight path (Image: FlightRadar24)

Aircraft Type : Airbus A320 (twin-jet)

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