Spain Experiences its Worst Train Accident in 40 Years

An increase in train derailments was one of the first symptoms of the approach of Planet X to become noticeable, being expressed even before Planet X entered the inner solar system in 2003.

Planet X was described as affecting the Earth from afar, like tugging on the edge of a spider web where the effects are felt elsewhere on the web; in this way there has been an increase in earthquakes and unpredictable weather going back years, even before Planet X entered the solar system, due to the increased swirling of the Earth’s core.

It is therefore logical that an increase in train derailments would accompany any increase in seismic activity – train tracks need to be straight and even the slightest shift to the side of a section of track would cause a train to derail.

The area most affected by train derailments is the stretch zone.  Stretch zone quakes are silent, and people are generally unaware anything is happening, although signs such as booms and trumpet sounds can occur.

This zone stretches from Western Europe across the Eurasian Plate, and also includes the South-East United States, the St. Lawrence Seaway, the Red Sea and the African Rift.

In other parts of the world, shifting ground is more associated with earthquakes that people are aware of, such as the Pacific which is compressing, so authorities inspect railway tracks after any seismic activity, reducing the likelihood of accidents.

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Comment by astrogal50 on July 10, 2011 at 4:06pm

LUCKNOW, India -- Rescuers searched through the wreckage of a packed express train for people trapped inside after it derailed in northern India on Sunday, killing at least 21 and injuring more than 100 others, officials said.

The Kalka Mail train was on its way to Kalka, in the foothills of the Himalayas, from Howrah, a station near Kolkata in eastern India, when 12 coaches and the engine jumped the tracks near the town of Fatehpur in Uttar Pradesh state, senior railway official A.K. Jain said.

The cause of the derailment was not immediately clear but it appeared that the driver applied the emergency brakes, Jain said.

At least 21 people were killed and rescue workers pulled at least 100 injured passengers out of the wreckage, said Brij Lal, a state police official...

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 10, 2011 at 8:52am

Shakuntala derails, none hurt


YAVATMAL: Shakuntala Express, the narrow gauge heritage train, derailed near Linga village, on Thursday. The three-bogie train that runs between Yavatmal and Murtizapur (in Akola) is still owned by a private British railway company that has given the Indian Railways on a 10-year renewable contract.

The train left Murtizapur railway station with only 14 people on board (11 passengers, train driver, his assistant and the guard). When the train reached the jungle track between Linga and Borgaon stations at about 8.30 pm it came to an abrupt halt. It was raining heavily and suddenly when there was landslide. Portions of walls erected along the hillside to protect the track caved in and the debris fell on the engine, causing the train to derail. None of the passengers were hurt and the driver and his assistant received only minor injuries.

Railway officials from Bhusawal reached the accident site with a 150-member labour force and tried to clear the track. The work continued till late night on July 8.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/nagpur/Shakuntala-derails-n...

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 10, 2011 at 8:50am

Train derails in Sioux City

Posted: Jul 09, 2011 7:21 PM EDT
 
SIOUX CITY, Iowa (KTIV) -

If you drove down Floyd Boulevard Saturday afternoon it was hard to miss.

A train off it's tracks.

Several cars, seven tankers in total could be seen derailed or on their sides.

The accident happened around noon at 27th Street and Floyd Boulevard.

Signage on the outside of the tanks indicates they were carrying alcohol used for ethanol.

A Union Pacific spokesperson says only two of the tankers were full and no product was released.

As of Saturday afternoon, crews were working to get the train back on its tracks.

The cause of the derailment is still being investigated.

The train was traveling from St. Paul, Minnesota to North Platte, Nebraska when it derailed around 12:30.

http://www.ktiv.com/story/15053789/train

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 8, 2011 at 8:16am

Track to reopen following freight train derailment

Quick ReadFreight trains collide; crew members leap to safety before impact

(AP) -- Two crew members leaped to safety from a moving locomotive moments before it slammed into the rear of another freight train in suburban Syracuse.

One track of the train line from Albany to Buffalo reopened Wednesday afternoon after the accident in DeWitt, and the other is expected to reopen Thursday morning. The CSX tracks carry Amtrak passenger trains as well as freight.

http://www.newsday.com/news/region-state/track-to-reopen-following-...

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 8, 2011 at 8:13am

Cleanup Continues of Derailed Coal Train


watch video
(Ashdown, AR) -- More details are emerging this morning about a multi-car train derailment in Arkansas.

It happened Tuesday afternoon along Highway 71 in Ashdown in Little River County, Arkansas. 

Little River County first responder Tim Stinnett was traveling on U.S.Highway 71 when he witnessed cars from a Kansas City Southern train derail.
"I saw coal cars flying and a big cloud of black coal smoke," Stinnett recalls.

Around 4:00 Tuesday afternoon, 33 cars loaded with tons of coal left the tracks just south of Ashdown.  It was a close call for a motorist approaching the rail road crossing at Little River County Road 23.

"There was a lady in a car at the crossing and she saw the train beginning to shake and she backed away in a hurry and fortunately she got away from it," says Don Hale, with Little River Emergency Management office.

One man received minor injuries after being hit in the face with flying coal. "And the guy blue pickup was black and he was covered in coal dust," Hale says.

Wednesday, workers were busy trying to clean the mess left behind and get rail traffic back and running through Little River County.  Kansas City Southern officials will not say what caused the derailment, but Little River authorities are just glad this train was only crying coal.

"It was something like you see off the movie I have never witness one before and I really don't want to witness another," Stinnett says.

Last year, Kansas City Southern had another train derail less than five miles from this site. No one was injured in that incident.

http://ozarksfirst.com/fulltext?nxd_id=483687

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 8, 2011 at 12:48am

Train derails over bridge in Shelby County, Indiana, denatured alcohol spilled into the river.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DVGKcDSGOU

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 7, 2011 at 9:06am

Update: Train line reopens at site of two-train collision this afternoon in DeWitt

Published: Wednesday, July 06, 2011, 5:12 PM     Updated: Wednesday, July 06, 2011, 7:38 PM
 
train1_3.JPGView full sizeScene of a train derailment in the Town of DeWitt today. More updates to follow.  

Update: One track of the train line from Albany to Buffalo reopened this afternoon following a two-train collision in DeWitt, a CSX train company spokesman said.

The track where the collision occurred is expected to reopen Thursday morning.

The heavily-traveled route carries Amtrak passenger trains as well as freight. -- 5 p.m.

DeWitt, NY -- Two CSX train workers jumped out of a moving locomotive moments before it plowed into the rear of another train in DeWitt, a witness said.

The two CSX workers were battered and bruised, but did not appear to suffer serious injuries, the witness said. A CSX spokesman confirmed two were taken to area hospitals.

One train apparently crashed into the rear of another train, causing eight to 10 train cars to derail, witnesses said. A train car carrying two modular containers ended up partially on top of the locomotive, sticking up into the air. The smell of diesel fuel wafted in the breeze.

The impact shook businesses along Court Street Road. Several witnesses said it felt like an earthquake.

Herb Goulet was working behind the counter at Barnes & Cone Architectural Masonry when the trains crashed.

Workers at the industrial facility are used to loud noises, but this was something else all together, Goulet said.

A dispatcher saw the crash on a security camera and yelled, "Get out! A train's coming off the tracks," Goulet said.

He evacuated with six custormers and all 35 Barnes & Cone workers took a roll call across the street. None of them were missing.

Goulet went to the tracks behind the business and saw two men -- the CSX employees -- running down the track.

Goulet and other employees offered the men aid until an ambulance arrived, he said. The men were calling CSX on cell phones to tell train dispatchers to close the tracks.

 Train Derailment in the Town of Dewitt
Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 7, 2011 at 8:56am

Train derails in Shelby County

Posted: Jul 06, 2011  
 
 
 
Photo by John Walker Photo by John Walker
 
Photo by John Walker Photo by John Walker
 
Photo by John Walker Photo by John Walker

SHELBY COUNTY - State police and Shelby County emergency personnel are investigating a train derailment just west of Morristown.

It happened late Wednesday afternoon on tracks which are situated parallel to US 52.

Bob Sullivan, a CSX Railroad spokesman, said the train was traveling from Cincinnati to Indianapolis.  The train had two locomotives and 94 freight cars.

Preliminary reports say that 9 cars have derailed, and 5 of them are in the Big Blue River, according to Sullivan.  It appears the train bridge over the river has collapsed.

There are no injury reports.  Sullivan said CSX has crews en route to the scene to recover the train and to work with local officials to assess any environmental impact.

The train's engineer told Eyewitness News that, as he approached the bridge, he noticed one of the rails on the bridge was bent.  He said he applied brakes, and most of the locomotive made it over the bridge without derailment.  However, some of the wheels of the locomotive left the track.

 

Earlier story:

SHELBY COUNTY - Crews are at the scene of a train derailment near Morristown. Reports indicate several train cars are derailed, and a bridge was damaged. No injuries have been reported.

The track is a CSX line and Morristown Police Department and Indiana State Police are on the scene.

Eyewitness News has a crew headed to the scene. Pictures will be added to this story as soon as they are available.

http://www.wthr.com/story/15037103/train-derails-in-shelby-county

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 6, 2011 at 8:08am

UPDATE: A total of 18 CSX train cars derailed about five miles south of Henderson off of Anthoston-Frog Island Road Tuesday afternoon, spilling loads of grain, sources said.

CSX spokesman Bob Sullivan said the train had three locomotives and 81 freight cars. He said it was traveling from Effingham, Ill., to Waycross, Ga., when the derailment occurred around 3:51 p.m.

Robbie Williams, who farms that land for his cousin, Steve Reed, said he and fellow farmer Scott Keach flew up in an airplane above the derailment once they heard about the spill.

“We wanted to see how bad a mess we had,” Williams said.

The derailment is about a half-mile into farm land north of Anthoston-Frog Island Road.

CSX is handling the clean-up of the spill, the cause of which is under investigation.

David Denton, Robards Fire Chief, was out at the scene to make sure there were no hazardous materials on board the train.

He said the derailment is out in a rural area, and no homes or roads are affected by the spill.

“CSX was on the scene when I got there,” he said. “There will be a lot more of them tonight.”

PREVIOUS:

An estimated 22 CSX train cars derailed about five miles south of Henderson off of Anthoston-Frog Island Road Tuesday afternoon, spilling loads of soybeans, an eyewitness said.

Robbie Williams, who farms that land for his cousin, Steve Reed, said he and fellow farmer Scott Keach flew up in an airplane above the derailment once they heard about the spill.

“We wanted to see how bad a mess we had,” Williams said.

The derailment is about a half-mile into farm land north of Anthoston-Frog Island Road.

Henderson County Dispatch said CSX is handling the clean-up of the spill, which was reported around 3:51 p.m.

David Denton, Robards Fire Chief, was out at the scene to make sure there were no hazardous materials on board the train.

He said roughly 17-20 cars derailed, and they all had soybeans on them. He said the derailment is out in a rural area, and no homes or roads are affected by the spill.

“CSX was on the scene when I got there,” he said. “There will be a lot more of them tonight.”

CSX was not available for comment after hours.

No other information was immediately available.

 

Comment by Starr DiGiacomo on July 2, 2011 at 7:33am

Amherst demands answers: Second derailment has officials alarmed


Photo courtesy of Michael Krasnik
Seven cars carrying lumber and crushed granite veered off the tracks near the Station Road crossing in Amherst just after 3 p.m Saturday. It was the second derailment in that area in a month.

Select Board Chairwoman Stephanie O’Keeffe said she is alarmed by the pair of derailments that have occurred recently near the Station Road crossing and questioned why the railroad should be allowed to resume running while investigations are under way.

"Why should we trust them that this isn't going to happen again?" she asked Town Manager John Musante at the board's meeting Monday.

After the second train derailment in a month took place in the same part of South Amherst on Saturday, Musante called for the general manager of the New England Central Railroad to come to town to explain. Steven Coomes, who is based in St. Albans, Vt., met with him and Amherst's public safety and public works officials here Monday. While investigators had not yet pinpointed a cause, Coomes told the Bulletin he is convinced the accidents are unrelated.

"We feel very confident that these are separate incidents," he said.

Crews have been working on the tracks where the derailments took place, and freight and passenger trains were expected to return to near-normal by the end of this week, Musante said.

Saturday's derailment, which occurred near the Station Road Crossing, and the one on May 31 took place only 2,200 feet from each other. Musante said the close proximity of the accidents "begs the question" about the condition of the track. But he said a "fairly intensive investigation" is being conducted by the railroad and the Federal Railroad Administration.

When the track reopens, the trains will travel over it at only 10 miles per hour instead of the usual 20 to make sure it is working properly, Musante said.

O'Keeffe speculated that perhaps the tracks are being allowed to deteriorate because there are plans to upgrade the tracks on the west side of the Connecticut River for passenger train service. Musante said that freight trains will continue to use the tracks that pass through Amherst even if the Amtrak stop moves to Northampton.

Passengers on Amtrak's Vermonter train were bused from Springfield to St. Albans this week because of the latest derailment. Spokesman Cliff Cole said passenger service through Amherst is expected to resume on Friday.

Saturday's incident took place in an area visible from the Norwottuck Rail Trail and close to wetlands which have been expanding in recent years because of beaver activity there. Guilford Mooring, the superintendent of public works, said that this activity, combined with above-normal rainfall recently, could have played a role in destabilizing the railbed.

The area is also close to an underground water source that feeds into wells that supply some of Amherst's drinking water. Although neither derailment resulted in the spill of hazardous substances, some neighbors expressed concern over the potential danger.

Michael Krasnik of Tanglewood Drive said he walked on the tracks after Saturday's derailment and noticed that many of the ties are rotting. Some of the train cars that didn't derail appeared to be carrying liquid carbon dioxide, he said.

"The town has to take a more proactive role," he said. "It's not the town's responsibility but considering that it's so close to the water supply, the town should take some measures instead of waiting for the railroad to fix it."

Musante said he told Coomes that this section of track is "particularly sensitive." He said of Krasnik's comments, "We share that concern. That's why we convened the meeting."

Saturday's derailment occurred farther away from the underground water supply than the one May 31, said Mooring.

If a train carrying hazardous chemicals derailed there and they spilled into the ground, there are steps that officials could take to minimize the damage and protect public health, he said. A chemical spill near a surface water supply such as the Atkins Reservoir would be more dangerous, Mooring said.

Musante said that Coomes was "very responsive" to the town's concerns at Monday's meeting.

"It was helpful to hear about the series of steps they're taking to repair the track and test the condition of the remaining railbed to make sure it doesn't happen again," he said.

 

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