Polar Push & Bounce Back -Trends at the Extremes NEW ZT

**NEW ZETATALK**

This blog is about the Arctic,Antarctica and Extreme Northern/Southern Hemispheres.  Are New Trends happening at the Poles? Weather Patterns, Charts, Images and Unusual Anomalies may be telling us something!

According to the Zetas,  the Wobble Effect has now combined with a new Polar Push!!  

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http://poleshift.ning.com/forum/topics/zetatalk-chat-for-november-2...

Both poles the sea ice loss is off the charts this month!  Seems something has changed?
[and from another] Is it related to the warming of the oceans from the bottom and the wobble? Where will this lead?[and from another]
https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/crazy-cryosphere-reco...
Sea ice extent and area have both plummeted to record lows for this time of year in both the Arctic and Antarctic. Such dramatic losses rarely occur at the same time, which means that the global total of sea ice coverage is phenomenally low for this time of year. The weirdness extends to midlatitudes: North America as well as the Arctic have been bathed in unusual mildness over the last several weeks, while Eurasia deals with a vast zone of above-average snowfall and below-average temperatures. [and from another]
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/nov/22/extraordinarily...



SOZT
It is clear from the charts that the Earth wobble has increased. First, despite Siberia being on the same latitude with Eastern Canada and Europe, there are vast temperature differences. The globe around the Arctic seems to be divided in half in this way at the current time. Just months ago, in July,
http://www.zetatalk.com/ning/23jy2016.htm
we stated that the hot and cold regions in the Northern Hemisphere were divided into four parts, due to the Polar Push and Bounce Back, and the lean to the Left and Right. Now the increased wobble has created a duality, not the quadrant arrangement of the Figure 8 that had been present since 2004.  

The Polar Push wherein the N Pole of Earth is shoved away from the approaching N Pole of Nibiru continues to create cold temperatures in Siberia, where the magnetic N Pole of Earth currently resides. This has also warmed Antarctica, which is getting more sunlight.  The Bounce Back is more fierce, so that Europe and eastern N America are also getting more sunlight, and thus the melting Arctic. What is missing is the temperature anomalies due to the tilt to the Left and Right. They have been lost in the more aggressive back and forth motion of the Polar Push and Bounce Back.  
EOZT

Prior ZT: http://www.zetatalk.com/ning/23jy2016.htm
The weather maps continue to document the daily Earth wobble, showing abnormal heat over the N American southwest and up into Alaska, and abnormal heat through Europe. Both these regions come under more equatorial sun due to the wobble, due to the lean to the left and then to the right. This is distinctly balanced by cold spots in between. Canada’s eastern provinces and the region above Hudson Bay receive less sunlight due this tilt to one side and then the other. Russia’s Far East and the Siberian region above China of course are pushed into the cold by the daily Polar Push, when the N Pole of Nibiru shoves the Earth magnetic N Pole away.

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The Polar Push Effect:

http://zetatalk.com/index/zeta103.htm

 

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Ecliptic Rise

http://www.zetatalk.com/index/earthtil.htm

Planet X approaches from the south, and the Pole Shift occurs because the S. Pole is pulled north with the N. Pole of Planet X during the passage. This stress is already evident in that many have noted that the Sun is too far south, rising too far to the south, for the time of year. Possible explanations for this are that the S. Pole has been pulled toward Planet X, creating a different tilt, but the constellations seem to be in their proper place. An alternate explanation is that the Earth's plane of the Ecliptic has changed, rising up, putting the Northern Hemisphere into a different slant, and placing the S. Pole more in line with the N. Pole of Planet X, an alignment Magnets Prefer.    

Natives to the Arctic,  the Inuit years ago already noticed many changes:

Uqalurait: the Snow is Speaking
November 23, 2009
http://www.isuma.tv/hi/en/inuit-knowledge-and-climate-change/uqalur...

An Igloolik elder, describes that uqalurait are changing because the earth itself has "tilted" and has thrown off the consistent wind patterns of the past. The earth tilting on its axis is another re-occuring observation that we are hearing from Inuit, which they know because of how the sun, moon and stars have changed in the sky. Indeed, elders simultaneously know the complexities of the cosmos, land, wind and sky.

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Both Poles are affected!

https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/crazy-cryosphere-reco...

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The Zetas describe the Final Days of the Wobble:

http://www.zetatalk.com/index/zeta582.htm

During the last weeks, the Earth changes from being in an end-to-end alignment with Planet X to being in a side-by-side alignment. It is during the end-to-end alignment, when Planet X is pointing its N Pole directly at the Earth, that the lean to the left and 3 days of darkness occur. But as Planet X continues in its retrograde orbit, its N Pole is no longer coming from the right, but is located to the left of the Earth, and the Earth adjusts by slinging its N Pole to the right. Thus, during the 6 days of sunrise west, the Earth still has its N Pole tipped away from the Sun and the approaching Planet X, but rather than a lean to the left, it has a lean to the right.
 
It is at this point that the Earth switches from being in an end-to-end alignment to being in a side-by-side alignment with Planet X. When Planet X is just at the Ecliptic, it stands upright in alignment with the Sun. As it switches from pointing its N Pole at Earth the Earth follows suit.
ZetaTalk: September 12, 2009

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Some charts to follow and/or post in this blog are HERE:

Climate ReAnalyzer

http://cci-reanalyzer.org

Google has the biggest collection of charts to view/post here!

https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/

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NEW ZETATALK SEPT 30, 2017 **

http://zetatalk.com/ning/30sp2017.htm

With a stronger Polar Push the bounce back would likewise be more extreme, and the bounce back occurs when the Sun is over the Atlantic.  As the wobble continued to get worse, the Figure 8 corrective lean to the right and left also got more extreme. This sets the stage for the current 2017 hurricane season.

(Modified Earth images are from Google Earth)

Sunlight on Earth reflection based on image in the Planet X Related Captures Blog

The Figure 8 of the wobble creates a churning in the Atlantic:

1.) First land on either side of the Atlantic is pushed under water during the Polar Push,

2.) Then the N American Continent is slung to the East

3.) Then to the West as the day dawns and

4.) Then the bounce back pulls this land back up to the North. 

The wobble, in short, is churning the North Atlantic in a circular motion. Where this fits with the Coriolis effect, where the winds and water curl up from the Equator in a circular motion, moving clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere, the lean to the left does a direct clash, pushing the storm back in a path toward the US coastline.

This is the current Wobble pattern, but the Wobble is subject to change:

5.) A lean into Opposition has occurred, the N Pole leaning toward the Sun. **NEW LEAN**

6.) And a temporary Lean to the Left could occur,

7.) as well as a temporary Day of Darkness for the Northern Hemisphere.

This is not a static situation. (this will occur more than once, in other words).

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Comment by jorge namour on October 2, 2017 at 7:48pm

Antarctic loses another piece

28 September 2017,

http://www.wikistrike.com/2017/09/l-antarctique-perd-encore-un-morc...

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=fr&tl=en&js=y&...

Breaking news from Pine Island Glacier, which lost 267km2 of icebergs today, after the internal crack resulted in a large calving event 1/n

The Antarctic has again lost a giant iceberg. This time it is an iceberg that has detached itself from the Pine Island glacier and is nearly the size of the New York City borough of Manhattan.

A gigantic iceberg with an area of ​​about 115 square kilometers has broken away from Antarctica, CBC News reported quoting the statement of the National Ice Center in the United States.

This iceberg is the third in the last four years to detach from the Pine Island glacier. In 2013 the glacier lost an iceberg with an area of ​​652 square kilometers and in 2015 another 582 square kilometers.

"It's not the size of the iceberg that matters. This is the frequency, "said Ian Howat, a glaciologist at Ohio State University, quoted by CBS News.

Comment by jorge namour on September 22, 2017 at 1:22am

Antarctica: The A68 iceberg, as big as Lazio, begins to move

Images of the iceberg in motion were captured by space, from the Sentinel-1 satellites of the Copernicus program, promoted by the European Commission and the European Space Agency (Esa)

http://www.meteoweb.eu/2017/09/antartide-liceberg-a68-grande-come-i...

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=it&tl=en&js=y&...

PHOTO FROM LINK:

The satellite, which on 12 July had captured the moment of breakage that had led to the formation of the iceberg, has now captured the time when the A68 iceberg, which has an area of ​​5,800 square kilometers and a thickness of 200 meters , he began to move.

The water that contains the iceberg, is three times that of Lake Garda, and is equivalent to the average water consumed in the world in five years. As early as the iceberg stayed close to the ice platform from which it was born, from September 16, it began to move, separating for the first time from the Larsen C platform of about 18 kilometers.

Comment by M. Difato on September 6, 2017 at 5:30pm

Pen Hadow Gives Up- Blocked By Sea Ice!

 https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2017/08/31/pen-hadow-...

Pen Hadow’s attempt to sail to the North Pole has been rather embarrassingly brought to an abrupt halt by sea ice!

The furthest North they got was 80 degrees 10 minutes, and after being moored to an ice floe for a day, the decision was made to turn tail and head south.

The Arctic Mission website tries to put the best spin on it:

Arctic Mission’s furthest North was 80 degrees 10 minutes North, 148 degrees 51 minutes West, reached at 22:04:12 (Alaskan Time, GMT-9hours) on 29 August 2017 by yachts, Bagheera and Snow Dragon II.

Arctic Mission moored its yachts to an ice floe on 29 August to conduct one of its 24-hour marine science surveys, while drifting with the sea ice. The strategy for any future northward progress had been to monitor the sea surface currents, sea ice, and weather conditions (both observed from the yachts and through satellites imagery downloaded onto our computers), and decide how to proceed as we approached the end of the 24-hour survey.

A meeting of the four skippers was held led by Erik de Jong, with Pen Hadow present, and it was agreed further northward progress would increase considerably the risks to the expedition, with very limited scientific reward. The decision to head south, back to an area of less concentrated sea ice in the vicinity of 79 degrees 30 minutes North, was made at 18.30 (Alaskan time)...."

~

and another,

Delingpole: Ship of Fools IV: Another Green Arctic Expedition Scuppered by Ice

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/09/01/delingpole-ship-...

This is not the first time Hadow has been denied the “bittersweet achievement” of pinning Arctic melt on “climate change.” In 2009 – with encouragement from the Prince of Wales – Hadow led the Catlin Arctic Survey expedition which had to be cancelled less than half way into its 800 mile trek because the equipment broke in the freezing temperatures.

His latest failure comes a year after yet another sailing expedition – this one called The Polar Ocean Challenge, led by veteran explorer David Hempleman-Adams – was also frustrated by unexpectedly large quantities of ice.

That was Ship of Fools II.

Ship of Fools I was, of course, the glorious December 2013 expedition to Antarctica – led by an Australian alarmist called Chris Turney, one of the correspondents in the Climategate scandal  – which had to be called off after becoming stuck in ice which Turney insisted could not have been predicted.

Then earlier this summer, we learned of Ship of Fools III – a Canadian research expedition which had to be cancelled because, you guessed it, of “unprecedented” summer sea ice.

Comment by jorge namour on July 12, 2017 at 8:02pm

Trillion-tonne iceberg finally snaps off West Antarctic ice shelf, scientists confirm

JULY 12, 2017

http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/climate-change/trilli...

A TRILLION-tonne iceberg more than four times the size of our ACT has finally broken off the West Antarctic ice shelf, scientists have confirmed.

The Antarctic Peninsula's rift in the Larsen C ice shelf from NASA's IceBridge mission Digital Mapping System. Picture: AFP

A TRILLION-tonne iceberg, one of the largest ever recorded, has snapped off the West Antarctic ice shelf, scientists have confirmed.
Researches have been monitoring the steadily growing crack in the Larsen C Ice Shelf for years. Swansea University finally announced on Wednesday that the rift had completed its path through the ice, causing a 5,800-square kilometre section of the shelf to snap off.

The massive ice cube is twice the size of the Australian Capital Territory, four times the size of London and twice the size of Luxembourg. It is about 350 metres thick.
“The iceberg weighs more than a trillion tonnes

he research team said. It will likely be named A68.

With the calving, the Larsen C ice shelf lost more than 12 per cent of its total surface area.
Icebergs calving from Antarctica are a regular occurrence. But given its enormous size, the latest berg will be closely watched as it travels, for any potential risk to shipping traffic.
The calving may have heightened the risk of the remaining ice shelf disintegrating, the Swansea team said.

Comment by SongStar101 on July 12, 2017 at 11:45am

Rain Over Arctic Ocean

http://arctic-news.blogspot.co.nz/2017/07/rain-over-arctic-ocean.html

It's raining over the Arctic Ocean and the rain is devastating the sea ice.

On July 6, 2017, cyclonic winds lined up to create a 'perfect storm'. As a result, an Atmospheric River of moisture was driven through Bering Strait into the Arctic Ocean, as shown on the images below.

On July 6, 2017, 1500 UTC, winds in Bering Strait were as high as 58 km/h (36 mph) at surface level (green circle on above image left), and as high as 82 km/h (51 mph) at 850 mb (green circle on above image right).



On July 6, 2017, surface temperatures of the air in Bering Strait were as high as 8.1°C (46.5°F) (green circle on image right).

Another indication of the strength of the wind driven through Bering Strait is wave height. On July 6, 2017, waves were as high as 3.35 m or 11 ft in the Bering Strait, at the location marked by the green circle on the image on the right.

The relatively warm and moist air driven through Bering Strait by strong winds is causing rain to fall over the sea ice of the Arctic Ocean, as shown on the video and images further below.

On July 7, 2017, high air temperatures were recorded over land and over the water.

The image below shows temperatures recorded at two locations over the Mackenzie River, one of 32.6°C or 90.8°F at the mouth of the Mackenzie River and another one of 34.7°C or 94.5°F further inland. Warm water from rivers can substantially warm up the sea surface and thus melt the sea ice.

Temperature of the surface of the water was 10°C or 50.1°F where the water was pushed into the Bering Strait, while temperatures as high as 46.9°C or 116.3°F were recorded over California.

The combined impact of high temperatures, strong winds, high waves and warm river water, rain water and melt water looks set to further devastate what sea ice is left in the Arctic Ocean.
Rain can be particularly devastating. The very force at which rain strikes can fracture the sea ice where it's weak, while pools of rainwater and meltwater will form at places where the sea ice is stronger. Where fractures appear in the sea ice, warm water can reach further parts of the ice and widen the cracks.

The video below shows rain over the Arctic Ocean. The video was created with cci-reorganizer.org forecasts from July 3, 2017, 18:00 UTC to July 17, 2017, 00:00 UTC.

See Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeyr4wdx5IQ

Arctic sea ice is in a terrible shape. Sea ice volume is at a record low, as indicated by the Wipneus image below showing volume anomalies from 2002.

The image below, by Torstein Viddal, shows how low the 2017 year-to-date average sea ice volume is.
An additional danger is wildfires. Due to high temperatures, wildfires have broken out near the Mackenzie River, as illustrated by the satellite image below.

Comment by SongStar101 on July 6, 2017 at 8:06pm

Dramatic changes seen with the Polar Push June 2017 in this long term graph!  WOW!

http://www.climate4you.com/SeaIce.htm

Comment by SongStar101 on July 6, 2017 at 8:01pm

Largest iceberg ever set to break away in a matter of days?

Massive crack in Antarctica ice shelf grows 11 miles in only 6 days

https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/sciencefair/2017/06/01/massive-...

A massive crack in an Antarctic ice shelf grew by 11 miles in the past six days as one of the world's biggest icebergs ever is poised to break off.

The crack in the Larsen C ice shelf is now about 120 miles long, and only eight miles remain until the crack cuts all the way across, producing an iceberg about the size of the state of Delaware.

Adrian Luckman of Project MIDAS, a British Antarctic research project that's keeping watch on the ever-growing crack, said it's the largest jump since January. The full process is known as "calving," the timing of which is "very close," he added.

Once the iceberg breaks off, it "will fundamentally change the landscape of the Antarctic Peninsula," he said.

Ice shelves are permanent floating sheets of ice that connect to a landmass, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Since the ice is already floating, the newly created iceberg won't contribute to rising sea levels.

Still, studying ice shelves and icebergs is important because they "hold back the glaciers that 'feed' them," Luckman said. "When they disappear, ice can flow faster from the land to the ocean."

A similar event happened 15 years ago with the dramatic break-up of part of the nearby Larsen B ice shelf. After that break, the number of glaciers behind it accelerated and are still flowing faster than before.

Comment by SongStar101 on July 6, 2017 at 7:54pm

Continued Sea Ice Extent drop in Antarctic June 2017!

http://www.climate4you.com/SeaIce.htm

Comment by SongStar101 on July 4, 2017 at 12:52pm

Rapid Melt going on..Here is a conversation about the latest developments

Topic: The 2017 melting season  (Read 367167 times)

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1834.2500.html

VeliAlbertKallio

Re: The 2017 melting season
« Reply #2529 on: Today at 12:41:12 AM »
Fracturing sea ice as seen from Yakutia to Alaska. Note the penetration of fractures deep into CAB - it is here where the next calving may occur (especially if winds arise to pull ice further apart).
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Re: The 2017 melting season
« Reply #2530 on: Today at 12:47:41 AM »
Heavily pulverized sea ice around Svalbard / Franz Joseph Land heading to the Atlantic 3.7.2017.

FishOutofWater

Re: The 2017 melting season
« Reply #2531 on: Today at 01:10:20 AM »
Jai, I was very aware when I posted that comment that it is steaming hot in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas and the CAA. The thin ice in the Beaufort is melting away like a frozen Margarita in Texas in July. That said the DMI 80ºN to the pole graph has been on the cool side.

The weather/climate models don't have any way to deal with the problems of thin ice so I have little confidence in the CFSv2 forecasts I have been reviewing. It's going to be very interesting to see how the weather responds to the early melt out in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

The main channel of the CAA is also showing signs of early break up. There's a lot going on and I wouldn't be surprised to see the melt out go very quickly on the Alaskan side of the Arctic ocean.
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Scottie
Re: The 2017 melting season
« Reply #2532 on: Today at 01:46:22 AM »
Hi all, long, long time lurker on the forum. breaking silence when I saw this - large area (10,000+ km2) of sea ice at the western end of the McClure Strait has detached and moved in the general direction of the Beaufort

oren

Re: The 2017 melting season
« Reply #2533 on: Today at 02:00:57 AM »
Hi all, long, long time lurker on the forum. breaking silence when I saw this - large area (10,000+ km2) of sea ice at the western end of the McClure Strait has detached and moved in the general direction of the Beaufort
Welcome scottie. A very interesting first post I must say, nice spotting.
Comment by M. Difato on June 16, 2017 at 12:45am

Climate change study in Canada's Hudson Bay thwarted by climate change

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jun/14/canada-hudson-bay-cli...

 "..In late May, 40 scientists from five Canadian universities set off from Quebec City on the icebreaker and  Arctic research vessel CCGS Amundsen. The expedition was the first leg of a four-year, C$17m research  project designed to delve into the effects of climate change on Hudson Bay.

 The icebreaker was soon diverted. Dense ice – up to 8 metres (25ft) thick – had filled the waters off the northern coast of Newfoundland, trapping fishing boats and ferries.

“It was a really dramatic situation,” said David Barber, the expedition’s chief scientist. “We were getting search and rescue calls from fishing boats that were stranded in the ice and tankers that were stranded trying to get fuel into the communities. Nobody could manage this ice because it was far too heavy to get through.”

Barber, a climate change scientist at the University of Manitoba, and the other scientists did what they could to help the Coast Guard rescue the vessels and carved a path for the tankers. They also took the time to study the ice that surrounded them, discovering that much of it was the multiyear ice typically seen in the high Arctic.

It was an unexpected find, said Barber, given the time of year and how far south they were. “It’s not something you would expect to see there and not something we’ve seen there before,” he said. “In the high Arctic, climate change is causing the ice to get thinner and there to be less of it..”

~

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