Imagine Planet X is clearly visible in the sky and the Severe Wobble has commenced. The Pole Shift countdown has begun, but how are you monitoring the passage of time?

 

Right now, it's a simple matter knowing what day it is and planning your schedule accordingly.  But when Earth is violently heaving from side to side during the Severe Wobble, a day will no longer be just another day.

 

In order to anticipate and plan for each of the Last Weeks events, I believe it will be necessary to begin recording time in at least 24-hour increments - beginning with the Severe Wobble. Although it may not be entirely obvious to everyone exactly when the Severe Wobble begins, anytime during this 9-day period will be a good time to establish a ritual of recording increments of time.  It will be unmistakable when Earth falls into a Static Lean to the Left and everyone will be able to see where they are on the Last Weeks Timeline and will already be in the habit of recording time.

 

The Zetas advise using "a manual clock or watch, not an atomic clock or watch adjusted by the Navy to disguise rotation slowing."  But what if the unthinkable occurs and you find yourself without a functioning clock during the Last Weeks?  How would you improvise to keep track of the days passed?

 

I plan on using two manual pocket watches with a couple of LED watches as back-up and will X off the days on laminated copies the Last Weeks Timeline, but I'm curious how the rest of you intend to keep track of the days and any alternative ways to record time should our clocks be rendered inoperative.

 

Right now, it may seem trivial to keep track of time during the Last Weeks.  But when Earth's slowing rotation makes each day increasingly longer and you're completely unaware the Pole Shift is only 6 days away, you'll wish you had.


 

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Cyaneus - The Zetas have warned that any clock hard-wired to the electrical grid will be manipulated to mask Earth's slowing rotation.  Battery operated clocks will not be subject to this, however, they are subject to failure from electro-magnetic surges from the charged tail of Planet X that will be wafting Earth during this time.  Mechanical wind-up clocks are your most reliable option for timekeeping during the Last Weeks. Read Surging Clocks in ZetaTalk Newsletter #248.


Thank you Howard I have passed this information on.  Much appreciated.

 

On a totally different subject, I believe we have a mutual friend in your hemisphere about whom I am deeply concerned.....I am trusting that those within range will do what they can, though this is not always appreciated.   The total absence of sensitivity to and awareness of both the depth and nature of the problem here has left me speechless.

Thankyou Howard! You now have me searching in earnest for an rugged automatic watch! I don't think my battery Longines will be suitable for the future :-((

On june 30, 2012 ¨they¨ will add 1 leap second...

From:

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=35815

@Recall 15

I heard this same news here in Finland. I remember thinkin "so here we go, what next.." This leap second will soon be leap minute..

Excellent advice re: manual timepieces!   In searching for a good option, I found that many of the kinetic or automatic watches store the charge from the wearer's motion into a battery or capacitor from which the watch runs.  My best guess would be that those would fall under the same risk of failure as standard battery operated watches.  Apparently some kinetic watches store the energy in a mechanical mainspring, if assuming by its name is a non-electronic component, would be a good option.  Those include some models of Rolex (not a financial option for most, including myself).  The Citizen Eco-Drive is reported to store its charge in a battery.  I would hate for people counting on a certain timepiece have it fail at the most critical moment. 

Here is a wiki link to more detailed information on automatic watches:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_watch

I have looking into purely windup options, and have not found any quality, affordable wristwatch options.  Lots of cheapies that, based on product reviews on Amazon, either have high failure rates or lose/gain significant amounts of time (apparently an average quality watch is expected to add/lose about 10-15 seconds per day).  However there are acceptable expensive models that get good reviews.

I might settle on windup alarm clock instead, they are much more affordable and readily available online. 

I believe that an easy way to keep track of time accurately is to acquire a solar powered watch. They do not need batteries of any kind, they do not even need the sun light, any light source will do, from a lantern to a candle, and they only need a small amount of exposure to light per day to keep fully operational. Citizen watches developed the system several years ago, they were not cheap, I bought one for my wife 6 years ago and cost me over $150, at the time I though it was expensive but realized how invaluable it would be during and after the PS to have a watch that would be accurate for a very long time. Now CASIO also makes solar powered watches and much more reasonable. I just got one 3 months ago online, with perpetual calendar to 2100, luminous numbers & dials, chronograph, weekdays, just about everything you can think of, for only$49.95. You can by solar powered CASIO's for as little as $20. Do NOT buy an Atomic watch.

I am not a CASIO share holder or intending to advertise them, but it seems an economical and easy way to keep track of time accurately whatever happens. Thanks Howard for this important topic.

P.S. An automatic watch is also an option, not as accurate as solar and have to be constantly moving, you can't just put them on the window ledge.

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